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  • Paul the Apostle
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  • St. Paul the Apostle, also known as Saul of Tarsus (c. CE 5-c. CE 67) was a prominent leader of Christianity in the religion's infancy. According to the Bible, Saul of Tarsus was a Jewish citizen of the Roman Empire who actively persecuted the followers of Jesus in Jerusalem. While traveling to Damascus, Saul met the resurrected Jesus, an encounter that left Saul blind for three days. When his sight was restored, Saul converted to Christianity and became an ardent missionary. Many of his writings, addressed as letters to churches in different provinces (primarily in Greece), were critical to the formation of the New Testament. According to the Acts of the Apostles, he took the name Paul from a man named Sergius Paulus who was his benefactor at one point.
  • Originally, he was a Pharisee named Saul, who hated the early Christians for believing in Jesus, as his kind believed Jesus was breaking God's law. He watched the coats of the other Pharisees who were stoning St. Stephen. He wasn't intentionally a bad guy; he was just trying to protect the Jewish law and the traditions of his fathers, but he had lost God's sight. He had put Christians in jail. He was on his way to Damascus with his friends when a light shone on him from Heaven. "Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?" asked the man in Heaven. When Saul asked Him who He was, He revealed that He was Jesus, whom he persecuted. He told Saul to arise and go to Damascus, where he would be told what to do. He was blinded and couldn't eat or drink anything for three days. Meanwhile, he repented of h
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Name
  • Paul the Apostle
Cause of Death
  • Decapitation
Religion
  • Christianity
Occupation
  • Philosopher, author
Death
  • c. CE 67
Birth
  • c. CE 5
Nationality
abstract
  • St. Paul the Apostle, also known as Saul of Tarsus (c. CE 5-c. CE 67) was a prominent leader of Christianity in the religion's infancy. According to the Bible, Saul of Tarsus was a Jewish citizen of the Roman Empire who actively persecuted the followers of Jesus in Jerusalem. While traveling to Damascus, Saul met the resurrected Jesus, an encounter that left Saul blind for three days. When his sight was restored, Saul converted to Christianity and became an ardent missionary. Many of his writings, addressed as letters to churches in different provinces (primarily in Greece), were critical to the formation of the New Testament. According to the Acts of the Apostles, he took the name Paul from a man named Sergius Paulus who was his benefactor at one point. The circumstances of Paul's death are not known for certain, but the most famous tradition holds that he and St. Peter were arrested in Nero's Rome on trumped-up charges of terrorism and mass arson. Both men were sentenced to death. Peter was crucified, whereas Paul, a Roman citizen, was allowed the "merciful" death of decapitation.
  • Originally, he was a Pharisee named Saul, who hated the early Christians for believing in Jesus, as his kind believed Jesus was breaking God's law. He watched the coats of the other Pharisees who were stoning St. Stephen. He wasn't intentionally a bad guy; he was just trying to protect the Jewish law and the traditions of his fathers, but he had lost God's sight. He had put Christians in jail. He was on his way to Damascus with his friends when a light shone on him from Heaven. "Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?" asked the man in Heaven. When Saul asked Him who He was, He revealed that He was Jesus, whom he persecuted. He told Saul to arise and go to Damascus, where he would be told what to do. He was blinded and couldn't eat or drink anything for three days. Meanwhile, he repented of his sins. When a man named Ananias entered the House of Judas, he prayed for Saul to see again. Saul received his sight, and was then baptized by Ananias. After baptism, Saul changed his name to Paul. He was being sought out by soldiers for "treason" and was assisted in being carried in a basket while being snuck out of Jerusalem. He preached and preached and preached and did good for other people. He even prayed to God for some people, and wrote letters, even through trials. Eventually, after his work was done, he was killed, but he wasn't afraid because he knew God loved him and he knew he'd live with them after his death. Some believe he was stoned just like Stephen, while others believe he was beheaded.
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