PropertyValue
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  • James Bond (character)
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  • The Bond character is a Secret Service agent, code number 007, residing in London but active internationally. Bond was a composite character who was based on a number of commandos whom Fleming knew during his service in the Naval Intelligence Division during World War II, to whom Fleming added his own style and a number of his own tastes; Bond's name was appropriated from American ornithologist James Bond. Bond has a number of character traits which run throughout the books, including an enjoyment of cars, a love of food and drink, and an average intake of sixty custom-made cigarettes a day.
  • In giving the world the gift of Bond, Fleming gave a part of himself. During the Second World War, Fleming worked for the British Intelligence Service, excelling within this shadowy world of secrets and spymastery. The young officer spent his time in intelligence headquarters dreaming up daring examples of British ingenuity and bravery. If jetpacks and poison-arrow-shooting watches had been invented by the 1940s, some of these plans would surely have been put into action.
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Relatives
  • Charmian Bond
  • Max Bond
Revision
  • 3711220
Date
  • 2009-03-19
Last
  • Spectre, 2015 film
Series
Spouse
Name
  • James Bond
Align
  • center
  • left
  • right
Caption
  • Ian Fleming's image of James Bond; commissioned to aid the Daily Express comic strip artists.
First
  • Casino Royale, 1953 novel
Width
  • 45.0
  • 50.0
  • 65.0
significantother
Title
  • Commander
BGCOLOR
  • #CFECEC
salign
  • right
Children
  • James Suzuki Bond
Occupation
Family
  • Andrew Bond
  • Monique Delacroix Bond
Gender
  • Male
Source
  • --09-30
  • --04-21
  • Casino Royale, Chapter 7: Rouge et Noir
  • Charlie Higson
  • Geoffrey Boothroyd, letter to Ian Fleming, 1956
  • Jeffery Deaver
  • Moonraker, Chapter 1: Secret paper-work
  • Raymond Benson
  • William Cook in the New Statesman
  • You Only Live Twice, Chapter 21: Obit:
  • Goldfinger, Chapter 1: Reflections in a Double Bourbon
Quote
  • If the quality of these books, or their degree of veracity, had been any higher, the author would certainly have been prosecuted under the Official Secrets Act. It is a measure of the disdain in which these fictions are held at the Ministry, that action has not yet—I emphasize the qualification—been taken against the author and publisher of these high-flown and romanticized caricatures of episodes in the career of a outstanding public servant.
  • In Bond novels and their ilk, the plot must threaten not only our hero but civilization as we know it. The icing on the cake is using exotic locales that "normal people" only fantasize about visiting, and slipping in essential dollops of sex and violence to build interest.
  • I deliberately steered clear of anything post Fleming. My books are designed to fit in with what Fleming wrote and nothing else. I also didn't want to be influenced by any of the other books ... for now my Bible is Fleming.
  • ... elastic office hours from around ten to six; lunch, generally in the canteen; evenings spent playing cards in the company of a few close friends, or at Crockford's; or making love, with rather cold passion, to one of three similarly disposed married women; weekends playing golf for high stakes at one of the clubs near London.
  • When I wrote the first one in 1953, I wanted Bond to be an extremely dull, uninteresting man to whom things happened; I wanted him to be a blunt instrument ... when I was casting around for a name for my protagonist I thought by God, [James Bond] is the dullest name I ever heard.
  • James Bond is the culmination of an important but much-maligned tradition in English literature. As a boy, Fleming devoured the Bulldog Drummond tales of Lieutenant Colonel Herman Cyril McNeile and the Richard Hannay stories of John Buchan. His genius was to repackage these antiquated adventures to fit the fashion of postwar Britain ... In Bond, he created a Bulldog Drummond for the jet age.
  • The films didn't influence me at all and nor did the continuation novels. I wanted to get back to the original Bond who's dark and edgy, has quite a sense of irony and humour and is extremely patriotic and willing to sacrifice himself for Queen and country. He is extremely loyal but he has this dark pall over him because he's a hired killer – and he wrestles with that. I've always found him to be quite a representative of the modern era.
  • It was part of his profession to kill people. He had never liked doing it and when he had to kill he did it as well as he knew how and forgot about it. As a secret agent who held the rare double-O prefix—the licence to kill in the Secret Service—it was his duty to be as cool about death as a surgeon. If it happened, it happened. Regret was unprofessional—worse, it was a death-watch beetle in the soul.
  • James Bond lives in a nightmarish world where laws are written at the point of a gun, where coercion and rape are considered valour and murder is a funny trick ... Bond's job is to guard the interests of the property class, and he is no better than the youths Hitler boasted he would bring up like wild beasts to be able to kill without thinking.
  • 'A dry martini,' he said. 'One. In a deep champagne goblet.' 'Oui, monsieur.' 'Just a moment. Three measures of Gordon's, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it very well until it's ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon peel. Got it?' 'Certainly monsieur.' The barman seemed pleased with the idea. 'Gosh, that's certainly a drink,' said Leiter. Bond laughed. 'When I'm ... er ... concentrating,' he explained, 'I never have more than one drink before dinner. But I do like that one to be large and very strong and very cold, and very well-made. I hate small portions of anything, particularly when they taste bad. This drink's my own invention. I'm going to patent it when I think of a good name.'
  • I wish to point out that a man in James Bond's position would never consider using a .25 Beretta. It's really a lady's gun – and not a very nice lady at that! Dare I suggest that Bond should be armed with a .38 or a nine millimetre – let's say a German Walther PPK? That's far more appropriate.
Creator
Nationality
  • British
abstract
  • The Bond character is a Secret Service agent, code number 007, residing in London but active internationally. Bond was a composite character who was based on a number of commandos whom Fleming knew during his service in the Naval Intelligence Division during World War II, to whom Fleming added his own style and a number of his own tastes; Bond's name was appropriated from American ornithologist James Bond. Bond has a number of character traits which run throughout the books, including an enjoyment of cars, a love of food and drink, and an average intake of sixty custom-made cigarettes a day. Since Fleming's death in 1964, there have been other authorised writers of Bond material, including John Gardner, who wrote fourteen novels and two novelizations; and Raymond Benson, who wrote six novels, three novelizations and three short stories. There have also been other authors who wrote one book each, Kingsley Amis (writing as Robert Markham), Sebastian Faulks, Jeffery Deaver, William Boyd, and Anthony Horowitz. Additionally a series of novels based on Bond's youth—Young Bond—was written by Charlie Higson. As spin-offs from the literary works, there was a television adaptation of the first novel, Casino Royale, in which Bond was played as an American agent. A comic strip series also ran in the Daily Express newspaper. There have been 26 Bond films; seven actors have played Bond in these films. __TOC__
  • In giving the world the gift of Bond, Fleming gave a part of himself. During the Second World War, Fleming worked for the British Intelligence Service, excelling within this shadowy world of secrets and spymastery. The young officer spent his time in intelligence headquarters dreaming up daring examples of British ingenuity and bravery. If jetpacks and poison-arrow-shooting watches had been invented by the 1940s, some of these plans would surely have been put into action. After the war, Fleming went and worked for a newspaper. As he sat at his desk, reporting on the nation's fattest cats and longest-married couples, Fleming's mind would wander to his secret service past. This did have an effect on his work. Eventually, someone suggested to Fleming that he write a spy novel. It turned out that he was a natural at it. Every year, Fleming would travel to his Goldeneye resort in Jamaica. There, amongst the golden beaches and crystalline blue sea, Fleming would lock himself in an airless room with a typewriter, facing the wall. He was a bit weird, really. But Fleming was a genius nonetheless and his novels were exported from Jamaica faster than marijuana. It was only a matter of time before the books were turned into films.
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