PropertyValue
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  • Take On Me
  • Take on Me
  • Take on Me
rdfs:comment
  • Take On Me is the sixteenth episode of Season 3 of the Canadian television series, Degrassi: The Next Generation. It originally aired on February 16, 2004 on CTV Television and on June 11, 2004 on The N. The episode was written by story editors Aaron Martin and Sean Carley and directed by Phil Earnshaw. It shares its title with the song by A-ha.
  • A song added to the first Mungyodance.
  • "Take on Me" is a song by the Norwegian synthpop band a-ha. Written by the band members, the song was produced by Alan Tarney for the group's debut studio album Hunting High and Low. The video features the band in a pencil-sketch animation method called rotoscoping, combined with live action. In "Breaking Out is Hard to Do", Chris Griffin is pulled into the music video at the grocery store and recreates several scenes with Morten Harket singing before escaping.
  • "Take on Me" is a synthpop song by the former Norwegian pop band, A-ha. It was played Season Six episode, "Asspen".
  • Take on Me – to synthpopowy przebój norweskiego zespołu muzycznego a-ha. Wydany został w roku 1985 i zasadniczo jest to ich najbardziej znany utwór. Jednak był tak dobry, że grupa kontynuowała swoje istnienie bazując niemal wyłącznie na tej jednej piosence.
  • "Take On Me" is a song by a-ha {| class="collapsible collapsed" style="width: 100%; text-align: center;"
  • Take On Me utilizes extensive rotoscoping. It begins with a young woman, played by actress Bunty Bailey, in a London cafe, reading a comic book about competitive motorcycle racing. While reading, the waitress writes out the bill for her to pay. The winner of the race, played by the band's lead vocalist Morten Harket, winks at the girl from the page. A cartoon hand reaches through the comic book, inviting the girl to enter his animated world. Through a creative effect they both view each other through a mirror which shows them, and the band members, alternately in live action and animated.
  • Todd: Hi there. You know, I get a lot of requests to review older music, but I never seem to get the chance. But one thing I do like to do when I'm [clips of "Drive By"...] bitching about Train or [...and "Turn Up the Music"] trolling Chris Brown, is to study one-hit wonders. Yeah, yeah, I know, everyone does. [Promo from VH1's 100 Greatest One Hit Wonders of the 80s] VH1 releases another list every week, something like The Top 100 Awesomely Bad One Hit Wonders of the 90s. But what bothers me is they don't go in deep enough. [Clips of "Tubthumping," "Afternoon Delight," "I'm Too Sexy," "Rock Me Amadeus"] This band formed, they had a hit, they didn't have another, they broke up, and that's all you ever hear.
  • "Take on Me" is a song by the Norwegian synthpop band A-ha. Written by the band members, the song was produced by Alan Tarney for the group's debut studio album Hunting High and Low, (1985). The song combines synthpop with a varied instrumentation that includes acoustic guitars, keyboards, and drums.
  • "Take On Me" is a song by the Norwegian synthpop band A-ha. Written by the band members, the song was produced by Alan Tarney for the group's debut studio albumHunting High and Low (1985). The song combines synthpop with a varied instrumentation that includes acoustic guitars, keyboards and drums.
  • Take on Me is an 18-chapter sex-comedy manga written and illustrated by Takamura Sessyu; collected in two volumes, following a fairly loose chronology. The story follows a small, skinny high-schooler named Tomonori Tsuda and his sexual adventures with his class's Huge Schoolgirl Hikaru Ohno. After accidentally photographing an upskirt of her, he half-heartedly blackmails her into sex, to which she enthusiastically agrees. Guilty for blackmailing her, he tells her she shouldn't have to have sex with him- only to find out that his blackmail didn't scare her in the first place, and that she was interested in him all along. From that point forward, their relationship progresses personally and sexually in this manga. Along for the ride are Hikaru's older sister (who is apparently 26, but with h
  • Take on Me was a video by A-Ha which is a mixture between live action and animation. The animated parts use a large amount of rotoscoping, and attempt to simulate moving pencil sketches. It was directed by Steve Barron and was first released in 1985. The video utilizes reflexivity extensively. It often draws attention to its animated form, with its frequent reversions to live-action imagery. This succeeds in giving the video a very novel aspect, and helps to captivate the audience for the duration of the video.
owl:sameAs
Season
  • 3
Bass
  • 2
dcterms:subject
AirdateUS
  • 2004-06-11
Row 4 info
Row 1 info
  • 2012-04-07
Row 4 title
  • Next review
Pro Keys
  • 3
Pro Guitar
  • 0
Row 2 info
  • 692.0
Pro Drums
  • 4
Row 1 title
  • Date Aired
Row 5 info
Row 2 title
  • Running Time
Harmonies
  • 4
airdateCAN
  • 2004-02-16
Row 5 title
  • Website
Row 3 info
Row 3 title
  • Previous review
Pro Bass
  • 1
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Number
  • 16
Previous
Drums
  • 4
Box Title
  • Take On Me
Label
Album
  • Hunting High and Low
Vocals
  • 4
bpm
  • 169
Game
  • Mungyodance
Name
  • Take on Me
Genre
Ratings
  • 316286
Caption
  • So needless to say, I'm odds and ends, I'll be stumbling away,Slowly learning that life is OK.
Keys
  • 3
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Title
  • Take On Me 200px
Image size
  • 320
Performer
Diff
  • Easy, Med, Hard
PC
  • 316
Singers
  • A-ha featuring Morten Harket
Guitar
  • 2
Episode
Video
Band
  • 3
By
  • A-Ha
Image File
  • Take on Me by krin.jpg
Artist
NEXT
Voices
  • A-ha featuring Morten Harket
Writer
  • Aaron Martin
  • Sean Carley
  • Magne Furuholmen, Morten Harket, Pål Waaktaar
Director
Year
  • 1984
  • 1985
abstract
  • Todd: Hi there. You know, I get a lot of requests to review older music, but I never seem to get the chance. But one thing I do like to do when I'm [clips of "Drive By"...] bitching about Train or [...and "Turn Up the Music"] trolling Chris Brown, is to study one-hit wonders. Yeah, yeah, I know, everyone does. [Promo from VH1's 100 Greatest One Hit Wonders of the 80s] VH1 releases another list every week, something like The Top 100 Awesomely Bad One Hit Wonders of the 90s. But what bothers me is they don't go in deep enough. [Clips of "Tubthumping," "Afternoon Delight," "I'm Too Sexy," "Rock Me Amadeus"] This band formed, they had a hit, they didn't have another, they broke up, and that's all you ever hear. I wanna know more. Clips of "Baby Got Back," "Nothing Compares 2 U," "Who Let the Dogs Out" Todd (VO): I wanna know why they didn't have a second hit. I wanna know if they're really one-hit wonders, because a lot of the time, they're not. I want to all about these mysterious strangers who briefly touched down and then disappeared into the ether. Todd: But I'm gonna need a really good one to kick off this project with. [Picks up a list, looks through and finds...] A-ha! Video for "Take On Me" Todd (VO): Our first act comes all the way from [Map of Northern Europe featuring...] Oslo, Norway. Now, when I think Norwegian bands, generally I'm thinking of the kind of music that never charts even one song. Clip of Dimmu Borgir Todd (VO): And for obvious reasons. But during the height of the MTV Era, three young men hit it back and became music video stars for one brief, shining moment. Those men were [pictures of...] lead singer Morten Harket, keyboardist [struggles to pronounce...] Pål Waaktaar, and guitarist [again...] Magne Furuholmen. They were the band known as a-ha. Let's check them out. Todd: Now obviously, you know their big hit, "Take On Me." If you don't, I'm gonna reach through the screen and smack you. Todd (VO): What with the hip retroness of everything 80s, you know this song and its utterly classic video, and I refuse to believe otherwise. The very least, you've seen [clip of...] the literal video, you kids with your YouTubes and skinny jeans and...ugh. Todd: So, okay, before we look at their career as a whole, let's take a quick look at "Take On Me," one of the greatest music videos of all time. Video for "Take On Me," but... Todd (VO): Wait a minute, what the hell is this?! Where's the sketch-pad drawings? Where's the pretty girl? Todd: [looks at notes] Ah, okay. See, this is the original version of "Take On Me" from 1984. Morten: Take on me... Todd (VO): Now, I'd always heard that "Take On Me" didn't get big until they'd made their one really good video, which...I never understood. [clip of "Too Shy" by...] Kajagoogoo made it big around the same time, and they didn't have a good video. Or a good song, for that matter; all they had was stupid hair. Watching this now, I think I do see the problem. The original video is boring and rightly forgotten, but also, this early version...needs work. [Main keyboard riff with...] I definitely can't say that I like this arrangement as much. I mean, I'm not a synth nerd by any means, but the Japanese, plucked-strings tone that he picked there is definitely wrong. Okay, well, this version did well in Norway, but... Todd: ...took them absolutely nowhere in the rest of the world. They were gonna need some help to push them over the edge. Meet the person that would help them do that. Clip of MTV interview with Steve Barron Steve Barron: Very first video I can remember seeing that was... Todd (VO): This man is music video visionary Steve Barron. [Clips of Michael Jackson - "Billie Jean," Dire Straits - "Money for Nothing," and Toto - "Africa"] A daring visual stylist who made some of the best videos of the 80s, and also a couple of the worst. Clip of Madonna - "Burning Up" Madonna: Closing the door Todd (VO): You have to understand that the music video was a pretty unsophisticated art form at this point, and some of his videos have not aged all that well. But [clip of Thomas Dolby - "She Blinded Me with Science"] he was very creative and he was willing to experiment in lots of different ways, and in the process, he created some truly indelible images that defined a decade. [Teaser of...] He also directed the first Ninja Turtles movie and managed to not turn them into aliens! But I digress. Todd: I don't think it's hyperbole to call "Take On Me" the best video of all time. Todd (VO): It tells the romantic tale of a comic book character who sucks a woman into his sketch world, and then they get attacked by bad guys and have to escape, and then he beats himself into a wall to turn three-dimensional. It is the most touching love story of our generation. And it's...it's astonishing how much you care about the romance between a woman who has no dialogue and a guy who is literally a two-dimensional sketch. Although we do find out a little. This chick is cute and shy, but she's also apparently pretty hip, as she reads these black-and-white, no-dialogue comic books. I always wondered what was going on in that thing; I think it's like a Scandinavian Speed Racer type of deal. Todd: But it all works. Perfectly. Todd (VO): The animation is great, it tugs at your heartstrings, and somehow it hasn't aged a second, especially compared with [clip of Starship - "We Built This City"] whatever else was coming out in '85. I felt more for this couple than I did for the ones in [poster of...] The English Patient, that's for damn sure. But the video isn't the only reason why "Take On Me" has endured throughout the decades. In some of the lyrics, you can really see that English is not this man's first language. Morten: So needless to say I'm odds and ends Todd (VO): But you know what? There's poetry in that. I'm not even sure he understood what "take on me" means, or that it's wrong grammatically, but it sounds great, doesn't it? Morten: Take on me Todd (VO): A lot of the early MTV acts were derided as talentless pretty boys trading off their looks rather than their music, but Harket proves he has the pipes here, as anyone who has humiliated themselves trying to sing this at karaoke has likely proven. Morten: ...or two... Todd (VO): For something so 80s, "Take On Me"—both the song and the video—is timeless and unbearably romantic. Todd: So where did it all go wrong? Todd: a-ha's second-biggest hit is actually their first-biggest hit in some countries. It's called "The Sun Always Shines on TV," and it actually outdid "Take On Me" in the UK and in Ireland, and did just about as well in most of Europe. Video for "The Sun Always Shines on TV" Todd (VO): This made it to #20 in this country, which makes them not a one-hit wonder, depending on how you define "hit." But people usually define a one-hit wonder by hindsight, and a-ha made just one lasting impression in people's minds and this wasn't it. Todd: Why is that? Todd (VO): You'd think it would work. "The Sun Always Shines on TV" once again finds them working with Steve Barron, which they would do continuously for the rest of their careers, which makes perfect sense to me—he basically made them. a-ha: Touch me How can it be Believe me The sun always shines on T.V Todd: I think listening to this song has really helped me to articulate what a-ha did so well. Like "Take On Me," they're just aching with emotions. Todd (VO): Now it doesn't have the soaring high notes of "Take On Me" or the awesome breakdown, but it's big and Gothic and almost as good. The clearest point of comparison for a-ha is obviously [clips of "Rio" by...] Duran Duran. But Duran Duran were all about looking cool and being sexy. [...and "Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go" by...] And there was Wham!, of course, but they were just...silly. Todd: But a-ha were romantics. Possibly [cover of NME Originals with...] New Romantics, I'll have to check on that. a-ha: Touch me Todd (VO): See, a-ha wanted you, they needed you, they wanted to touch your soul, they had so many deep feelings that they needed to share with you. And you know what? [Clip of "Hungry Like the Wolf"] Personally, I never saw the big deal about Duran Duran looks-wise. But this Morten Harket, he is a dreamboat. His eyes, they look straight into your heart. Todd: So why'd this song fail so badly at the charts? Why is this not as fondly remembered as "Take On Me"? Well...it could be that Harket's grasp at English had seriously started to fail him. Todd (VO): "Take On Me," even with the ESL stuff, is quite touching. Morten: It's no better to be safe than sorry Todd: "The Sun Always Shine on TV," though, is...hard to interpret. Morten: Please don't ask me to defend The shameful lowlands of the Way I'm drifting gloomily through time Oh oh oh Todd: You sure? 'Cause I was definitely going to ask you to defend the shameful lowlands of the way you're drifting gloomily through time. Todd (VO): That was the #1 question on my mind. Or at the very least, to defend the shameful weirdness of the way you're drifting confusedly through your thesaurus. Todd: But for me, it's not that. I personally am putting the blame squarely on the video. Todd (VO): Not because of the weird creepy heads facing everywhere—I mean, that's definitely a bunch of pointless weirdness, but that was everywhere in the 80s. Todd: No, I blame the opening scenes. Todd (VO): 'Cause you know the couple in "Take On Me"? They didn't make it! Nope, he reverts back into pencil sketches and runs off. It even comes with a "The End." That's it. Todd: A nice "screw you" to everyone who cared about those two people! Todd (VO): He pounded on the walls to make the black-and-whiteness go away. Why couldn't he do it again?! I wanted them to make it. I guess it makes sense that where "Take On Me" was hopeful and inviting, "The Sun Always Shines on TV" would be aching and unhappy, but...[fighting back tears] no. Todd: No, it...it's not fair. It's just not fair. Todd (VO): The sun always shines on TV...unless that TV is showing this music video, I guess. Thanks a lot, Steve Barron! Todd: Uh, yeah, a ton of them. Let me make this clear. These alleged one-hit wonders were enormously successful. Live performance of "Take On Me" Todd (VO): They were big in Europe throughout the 80s and humungous in Norway for a good 25 years, they're the most successful Norwegian act of all time, and they sold 36 million albums. Saleswise, that makes them one of the biggest Scandinavian acts of all time, roughly around as big as Ace of Base. Other career highlights for a-ha include when they played to a sell-out crowd at Rock in Rio in 1991. But if you know anything about this band besides "Take On Me"... Todd: ...it's probably their theme to a James Bond movie. Video for "The Living Daylights" Todd (VO): They may not have had any more American hits, but they still had enough clout in Europe that they chosen to perform the theme to the 1987 film, The Living Daylights. Haven't seen that one? Yeah, there's a reason—the Bond is [pictures of...] Timothy Dalton, the bad guy is Joe Don Baker. I've seen it, and trust me, you can go ahead and skip that one. a-ha: In the living daylights Todd (VO): The song is okay, I guess. a-ha's sweeping bigness makes them a good choice for a James Bond theme, but all I hear in this is a grim reminder that the 80s were really, really [picture from Octopussy: Bond (Roger Moore) dressed as a clown] not good for 007. Todd: Personally, if I had to pick out one other song that I really do think people should listen to, I'd tell you that they actually do [clip of the original...] a really awesome cover of the Everly Brothers' "Crying in the Rain." Everly Brothers: I'm gonna wear a smile and walk in the sun I may be a fool [Cut to a-ha video for same] a-ha: ...but till then darling you'll Never see me complain I'll do my crying in the rain Todd: So, verdict? Todd: Hell, yeah, they did. Montage of a-ha videos, ending with "Butterfly, Butterfly (The Last Hurrah)" Todd (VO): Hell, we let the Thompson Twins have a bunch of hits, why should a-ha have been any different? I wouldn't say they should've been one of the biggest names ever or anything, but they were probably too good and too successful in their home country to be dismissed as just one-hitters. They were not, in fact, gone in a day or two. They toured right up to about 2010 before retiring, and they released one more goodbye video, again with Steve Barron, where they turned into animated butterflies and flew away. Aw. Todd: Farewell, a-ha. May you forever hit those high notes.
  • Take on Me was a video by A-Ha which is a mixture between live action and animation. The animated parts use a large amount of rotoscoping, and attempt to simulate moving pencil sketches. It was directed by Steve Barron and was first released in 1985. The video follows a young woman who is sitting in a cafe and looking at a comic book based on a group of motorcycle racers. As the winner crosses the finish line, he winks at the young girl and then proceeds to reach his hand out of the comic and pull her into it. Here every part of the world is animated, and often has the feel of an Anime piece. While inside, the director uses an interesting technique where the two look at each other from different sides of a panel in which they can see what the other looks like in real life. As the video continues, the girl is transported back out of the comic book. She continues to read the comic, but gets drastically upset when she sees the man lying, presumably unconscious, after he is beat up by other racers. As she begins to cry the man instantly appears in real life where the girl is currently reading the comic. He starts in animated form but then throws himself into a wall where each time he hits the wall he goes from animated form to live-action form then back to animated. Finally he stays in live-action form in order to stay with the girl. The video utilizes reflexivity extensively. It often draws attention to its animated form, with its frequent reversions to live-action imagery. This succeeds in giving the video a very novel aspect, and helps to captivate the audience for the duration of the video. This video was parodied in an episode of Family Guy, in which Chris gets pulled from a supermarket into a world animated in the same style as "Take on Me."
  • Take On Me utilizes extensive rotoscoping. It begins with a young woman, played by actress Bunty Bailey, in a London cafe, reading a comic book about competitive motorcycle racing. While reading, the waitress writes out the bill for her to pay. The winner of the race, played by the band's lead vocalist Morten Harket, winks at the girl from the page. A cartoon hand reaches through the comic book, inviting the girl to enter his animated world. Through a creative effect they both view each other through a mirror which shows them, and the band members, alternately in live action and animated. When the waitress of the cafe comes back for the bill, she finds the girl missing and believes that she has left without paying. She angrily crumples up the comic book and throws it into the wastebasket. As this happens, two of Harket's competitors in the race come back for revenge. One, wielding a pipe wrench, smashes the mirror. Harket punches one of the thugs and retreats with the girl into a maze created by the crumpled paper. Harket tears a hole so the girl can escape as he faces the two thugs. The girl reappears on the floor next to the waste basket in the coffee shop, heavily ink-stained, to the surprise of the entire shop cliente and employees. The startled girl grabs the crumpled comic book and runs out of the coffee shop to her home, where she tries to smooth out the creases. One of the panels shows Harket lying unconscious, and she begins to cry. Harket then wakes up and starts hitting against the edges of the panel. Suddenly, he appears in the girl's room and throws himself back and forth against the corridor walls, flashing between animated and live action. Eventually, he becomes the latter, and he and the girl embrace each other.
  • Take On Me is the sixteenth episode of Season 3 of the Canadian television series, Degrassi: The Next Generation. It originally aired on February 16, 2004 on CTV Television and on June 11, 2004 on The N. The episode was written by story editors Aaron Martin and Sean Carley and directed by Phil Earnshaw. It shares its title with the song by A-ha.
  • A song added to the first Mungyodance.
  • "Take On Me" is a song by the Norwegian synthpop band A-ha. Written by the band members, the song was produced by Alan Tarney for the group's debut studio albumHunting High and Low (1985). The song combines synthpop with a varied instrumentation that includes acoustic guitars, keyboards and drums. The original "Take On Me" was recorded in 1984 and took three releases to chart in the United Kingdom, reaching number two on the UK Singles Chart in November 1985. In the United States in October 1985, the song became the only A-ha song to reach the top position of the Billboard Hot 100, due in no small part to the wide exposure on MTV of its innovative music video, directed by Steve Barron. The video features the band in a pencil-sketch animation method called rotoscoping, combined with live action. The video won six awards and was nominated for two others at the 1986 MTV Video Music Awards. In 2013, both Cuban American rapper Pitbull, along with American recording artist Christina Aguilera, took a heavy sample of the song for their hit song "Feel This Moment", which, although not a cover version, charted at number five in the UK and number eight in the US, while they charted number one on both the dance charts in both of the respective countries.
  • Take on Me is an 18-chapter sex-comedy manga written and illustrated by Takamura Sessyu; collected in two volumes, following a fairly loose chronology. The story follows a small, skinny high-schooler named Tomonori Tsuda and his sexual adventures with his class's Huge Schoolgirl Hikaru Ohno. After accidentally photographing an upskirt of her, he half-heartedly blackmails her into sex, to which she enthusiastically agrees. Guilty for blackmailing her, he tells her she shouldn't have to have sex with him- only to find out that his blackmail didn't scare her in the first place, and that she was interested in him all along. From that point forward, their relationship progresses personally and sexually in this manga. Along for the ride are Hikaru's older sister (who is apparently 26, but with hormone deficiency), some sworn rivals, and a pair of bisexual twins whom Tsuda loses his virginity to - but he doesn't want to admit it. Renamed Domin8 Me when it was released in North America to avoid confusion with the 1980s hit by A-ha (granted it was just one of MANY musical and movie references contained within the manga - particularly, the chapter titles). * Alpha Bitch: Enatsu. * Author Appeal: Tsuda wears glasses. Hikaru wears glasses. Kei wears glasses. Ryoko and Koichi also wear glasses. Even the twins also wear glasses. * Biggus Dickus: Big surprise there. * Bi the Way: Hikaru and the twins. * Berserk Button: The gap between Kei's apparent age and her actual one is a... sore point for her. * But Not Too Foreign: The Twins. They're half Mexican. * Technically they're Half-Mexican, Quarter-Dutch and Quarter-Japanese. * Christmas Cake: Kei, though you wouldn't know it at first glance. * Coming of Age Story: Multiple definitions implied * Covert Pervert: Hikaru. * Excuse me, but what exactly is "covert" about her? * Maybe it's because she's perpetually poker-faced. Besides, outside of two incidents, what's keeping Hikaru from stripping Tomonori down in public and riding him into the sunset? * Evilly Affable: The Rapist from chapter 13. * Home Porn Movie: Kei stumbles onto Hikaru and Tsuda's three-gigabyte and growing collection. * Huge Guy, Tiny Girl: Enatsu and Tatsukawa. * Inverted with Tsuda (shortest student in class) and Hikaru (182 cm tall) * Huge Schoolgirl: Hikaru. * The Immodest Orgasm: See Say My Name below. * Lolicon: Poor Kei. It seems the only men her age not dissuaded from dating her by the prospect of seeming to be child molesters are child molesters.... * Dating for her. Failure Is the Only Option and she knows it. * Meganekko: Hikaru, Kei, Enatsu and technically Tsuda. * Megaton Punch: Kei pulls this off every so often. * Not So Different: Hikaru and Enatsu are both very experienced in bed, rivals or no. The biggest hint for Enatsu is her... talent... for convincing the (male) referee that she was right during a baseball game. * Office Lady: Kei * Older Than They Look: Kei. She's FREAKING 26 YEARS OLD, but looks half her age. This also leads to initial difficulties during certain activities. * Plot With Porn * Porn Stash: Hikaru's keeps hers in a computer, but her sister found them easily enough. They're also self-made. * Rape as Drama: Chapter Thirteen. Played surprisingly straight. * The Rival: Enatsu. * Say My Name: Enatsu lays off torturing Hikaru after the latter says Tsuda's name. * Sex as Rite-Of-Passage: Kei has never had a lover in her 26 years, and is willing to go so far as to try blackmailing her kid sister's boyfriend into initiating her. * Sex Equals Love: During most of the manga Hikaru and Tomonori treat they're relationship as semi-serious sex friends until the climax where Enkatsu pretty much rapes Hikaru into admitting that she fell in love with Tomonori. It should be noted that said rape happened because Hikaru fell into a Heroic BSOD after Tomonori admitted his love in front of the class and Enkatsu was pretty pissed that it was taking Hikaru this long to realize her own feelings. * Shotacon: The visual aesthetic between Tsuda and Hikaru invokes this. * The twins. Dear god, the twins! * In fact, Kei's relationship with the twins pretty much serves as the series' main loli/shota fanservice. * Spell My Name with an "S": Tsuda was originally Tsushida in the translation. * Theme Naming: The manga's Japanese title and its chapter titles are based off song and film titles. To wit: Knockin' on Heaven's Door, Sex Lies and Videotape, Reservoir Dogs, etc. etc. * Tiny Guy, Huge Girl: Tsuda is 156 cm (5' 1.4") and on the scrawny side while Hikaru is 182 cm (5' 11.7") (5'1 and 6'1 in the English translation) * You have to consider Tsuda IS huge, but not in terms of height. * Token Mini-Moe: Kei. * Tomboy and Girly Girl: Hikaru and Enatsu. * Twincest: Again, par for the course. * Wholesome Crossdresser: The twins (for certain values of "wholesome," of course). Also, Tsuda gets forced into wearing women's clothing in a chapter with obvious results.
  • "Take on Me" is a song by the Norwegian synthpop band A-ha. Written by the band members, the song was produced by Alan Tarney for the group's debut studio album Hunting High and Low, (1985). The song combines synthpop with a varied instrumentation that includes acoustic guitars, keyboards, and drums. The original "Take on Me" was recorded in 1984, and took three releases to chart in the United Kingdom, reaching number two on the UK Singles Chart in November 1985. In the United States, the song was the only ever A-ha song to reach the top position of the Billboard Hot 100 in October 1985, due in no small part to the wide exposure of its memorable and cutting-edge music video on MTV, directed by Steve Barron. The video features the band in a pencil-sketch animation method called rotoscoping, combined with live action. The video won six awards, and was nominated for two others at the 1986 MTV Video Music Awards.The music video's directors received inspiration for the video from watching,"Orpheus," a foreign film to be the first to use special effects.
  • "Take on Me" is a song by the Norwegian synthpop band a-ha. Written by the band members, the song was produced by Alan Tarney for the group's debut studio album Hunting High and Low. The video features the band in a pencil-sketch animation method called rotoscoping, combined with live action. In "Breaking Out is Hard to Do", Chris Griffin is pulled into the music video at the grocery store and recreates several scenes with Morten Harket singing before escaping.
  • "Take on Me" is a synthpop song by the former Norwegian pop band, A-ha. It was played Season Six episode, "Asspen".
  • Take on Me – to synthpopowy przebój norweskiego zespołu muzycznego a-ha. Wydany został w roku 1985 i zasadniczo jest to ich najbardziej znany utwór. Jednak był tak dobry, że grupa kontynuowała swoje istnienie bazując niemal wyłącznie na tej jednej piosence.
  • "Take On Me" is a song by a-ha {| class="collapsible collapsed" style="width: 100%; text-align: center;"
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