PropertyValue
rdf:type
rdfs:label
  • Lop Nur
  • Lop nur
rdfs:comment
  • * Lop Nur (Lop Lake) is the name of a former salt lake in China (mostly dried-up now). The lake was also referred to as the “Wandering Lake.” The Loulan was an ancient kingdom based around an oasis city on the Lop Desert.
  • By the death of the prince's grandson, the search for the missing tooth had to be discontinued, as the dynasty was on it's way to end. The dig was by then ~1500 m (.935 miles) deep and the Great Wall of China had been completed with the stones from Lop Nuur. The Lo-pu-bo (engl."uncle's tooth mine", the name that had to be hissed) begun to develop lake system into which the Tarim River, named after the pet wapiti of the rivalling general, empties its last remnants of salt water. 'P'u-ch'ang Hai (engl. "sea of extended work songs") lake in the excavation is hydrologically still endorheic ; it is landbound and there is no outlet, not even down despite the heroic efforts of later chinamen. It was determined to be an ancient single salt lake by ancient Chinese geographers, who used only ancient
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  • 380
songtitle
  • "lop nur"
original upload date
  • Apr.27.2013
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abstract
  • * Lop Nur (Lop Lake) is the name of a former salt lake in China (mostly dried-up now). The lake was also referred to as the “Wandering Lake.” The Loulan was an ancient kingdom based around an oasis city on the Lop Desert.
  • By the death of the prince's grandson, the search for the missing tooth had to be discontinued, as the dynasty was on it's way to end. The dig was by then ~1500 m (.935 miles) deep and the Great Wall of China had been completed with the stones from Lop Nuur. The Lo-pu-bo (engl."uncle's tooth mine", the name that had to be hissed) begun to develop lake system into which the Tarim River, named after the pet wapiti of the rivalling general, empties its last remnants of salt water. 'P'u-ch'ang Hai (engl. "sea of extended work songs") lake in the excavation is hydrologically still endorheic ; it is landbound and there is no outlet, not even down despite the heroic efforts of later chinamen. It was determined to be an ancient single salt lake by ancient Chinese geographers, who used only ancient maps, which were badly outdated. Premongols visited the area in 200 B.C. - 200 CE. At first they were fascinated by the Amazonian tribe they found on the site, but after being perplexed by the deepness of the though that had brought the tribe there, decided to kill them and shoved them in the hole on the ground. Shortly afterwards there was a seismic shock which erased their memory by a freak occurrence of magnetic anomaly. The account on this episode can be found from the Tibetan monastery of Eldorado Tin Can, carefully inscribed by the armadillo farmer living near the start of the cavity of the Himalayan Underpass (the other magnificent seismically destroyed monument of the Asian Golden Age (AGA)). Since the mongols left the area, no-one visited the site for a century, but then a Qinq-dynastian civil servant noted a serious lack in the archives. The lack was the tooth, that had been falsely accounted in the inventory of the late prince's tomb that had to be opened to get some money from the ancestors. Several things lead to one, and the official found himself searching for the tooth by the threat of death penalty. The lake system had largely dried up from the mongol era by the late action of siberian traps and measured only 3,10 l(r)i². A jackal brought the tooth straight in to the official's hand in a desperate attempt to trade for water. This succeeded and the civil servant was decommissioned from the search.