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  • Abbie Hoffman
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  • Abbie Hoffman (November 30, 1936 - April 12, 1989), also known as 'Free', was an American leader of the Yippies (Youth International Party), a New Left group in the 1960s which he co-founded with Jerry Rubin, Stew Albert and others. Hoffman, a graduate of Brandeis University where he studied under Herbert Marcuse, was the author of a number of bestselling books, including Steal This Book, Revolution for the Hell of It and Woodstock Nation. He was also one of the Chicago 8, with charges arising from his role in the 1968 Democratic National Convention protests.
  • Abbie Hoffman (Abbot Howard "Abbie" Hoffman) was a political and social activist who co-founded the Yippies (Youth International Party). Born on November 30, [1936]] in Worster, Massachusetts, he was a symbol of youth rebellion in the 1960s. Hoffman died on April 12, 1989.
  • Hoffman was arrested and tried for conspiracy and inciting to riot as a result of his role in protests that led to violent confrontations with police during the 1968 Democratic National Convention, along with Jerry Rubin, David Dellinger, Tom Hayden, Rennie Davis, John Froines, Lee Weiner and Bobby Seale. The group was known collectively as the "Chicago Eight"; when Seale's prosecution was separated from the others, they became known as the Chicago Seven. While the defendants were initially convicted of intent to incite a riot, the verdicts were overturned on appeal.
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notableworks
  • Revolution for the Hell of It, Woodstock Nation, Steal This Book
Movement
  • 1960.0
Birth Date
  • 1936-11-30
Period
  • 1967
Subject
death place
Name
  • Abbie Hoffman
Genre
Ethnicity
Caption
  • Hoffman visiting the University of Oklahoma to protest the Vietnam War, c. 1969
Other Names
  • Cardinal Spellman, FREE!, Barry Freed
Alma mater
  • Brandeis University and University of California, Berkeley
Birth Place
Influences
  • 1960.0
death date
  • 1989-04-12
Image size
  • 225
Occupation
  • Writer, activist, psychologist, speaker
Birth name
  • Abbot Howard Hoffman
Nationality
influenced
abstract
  • Abbie Hoffman (November 30, 1936 - April 12, 1989), also known as 'Free', was an American leader of the Yippies (Youth International Party), a New Left group in the 1960s which he co-founded with Jerry Rubin, Stew Albert and others. Hoffman, a graduate of Brandeis University where he studied under Herbert Marcuse, was the author of a number of bestselling books, including Steal This Book, Revolution for the Hell of It and Woodstock Nation. He was also one of the Chicago 8, with charges arising from his role in the 1968 Democratic National Convention protests. His contribution to political analysis and fun-oriented, Situationist-influenced action in the late-1960s and 1970s was profound, but he was criticised by many liberals and radicals for promoting violence as a valid tactic (as in the Steal This Book chapters 'People's Chemistry', in which he extolled the virtues of making bombs, and 'Piece Now' which exhorted political activists to have and presumably use firearms). He wrote "Once you get the hang of using a gun, you'll never want to go back to the old peashooter". Hoffman, who suffered from Bipolar Disorder, was found dead at his home in New Hope, Pennsylvania, USA, aged 52 years. The autopsy confirmed that he’d taken 150 Phenobarbital and was legally drunk at the time of his death, which was recorded as a suicide. He left a note reading "It's too late. We can't win, they've gotten too powerful."
  • Hoffman was arrested and tried for conspiracy and inciting to riot as a result of his role in protests that led to violent confrontations with police during the 1968 Democratic National Convention, along with Jerry Rubin, David Dellinger, Tom Hayden, Rennie Davis, John Froines, Lee Weiner and Bobby Seale. The group was known collectively as the "Chicago Eight"; when Seale's prosecution was separated from the others, they became known as the Chicago Seven. While the defendants were initially convicted of intent to incite a riot, the verdicts were overturned on appeal. Hoffman came to prominence in the 1960s, and continued practicing his activism in the 1970s, and has remained a symbol of the youth rebellion of that era.
  • Abbie Hoffman (Abbot Howard "Abbie" Hoffman) was a political and social activist who co-founded the Yippies (Youth International Party). Born on November 30, [1936]] in Worster, Massachusetts, he was a symbol of youth rebellion in the 1960s. Hoffman died on April 12, 1989. Hoffman was arrested and tried for conspiracy and inciting to riot as a result of his role in protests that led to violent confrontations with police during the 1968 Democratic National Convention, along with Jerry Rubin, David Dellinger, Tom Hayden, Rennie Davis, John Froines, Lee Weiner and Bobby Seale. The defndants were known collectively as the "Chicago Eight"; when Seale's prosecution was separated from the others, they became known as the Chicago Seven. Their convictions in an embarrassingly political trial were overturned on appeal.