PropertyValue
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rdfs:label
  • Hobey Baker
rdfs:comment
  • Hobey Baker was an American pilot serving in the Lafayette Escadrille in World War I.
  • Baker was born in Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia. He attended St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire, where Malcolm Gordon was coach of the ice hockey team, and he graduated in 1909.
  • Hobart Amory Hare "Hobey" Baker (January 15, 1892 – December 21, 1918) was an American amateur athlete of the early twentieth century. Considered the first American star in ice hockey by the Hockey Hall of Fame, he was also an accomplished American football player. Born into a prominent family from Philadelphia, he enrolled at Princeton University in 1910. Baker excelled on the university's hockey and football teams, and became a noted amateur hockey player for the St. Nicholas Club in New York City. He was a member of three national championship teams, for football in 1911 and hockey in 1912 and 1914, and helped the St. Nicholas Club win a national amateur championship in 1915. Baker graduated from Princeton in 1914 and worked for J.P. Morgan Bank until he enlisted in the United States Ar
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Allegiances
Unit
  • 13
  • 103
  • 141
dcterms:subject
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serviceyears
  • 1917
Birth Date
  • 1892-01-15
Branch
death place
  • Toul, France
Text
  • Young Indy on DVD: A Tour of Volume 2, Disc 5
Align
  • left
  • right
Width
  • 22
  • 30.0
Character Name
  • Hobey Baker
Height in
  • 9
halloffame
  • 1945
Birth Place
Weight lbs
  • 160
career start
  • 1910
career end
  • 1916
College
  • Princeton University
played for
Awards
death date
  • 1918-12-21
Rank
  • 15
Image size
  • 200
playing teams
Allegiance
Battles
playing years
  • 1911
Height ft
  • 5
Profession
  • Pilot
  • Hockey player
CollegeHOF
  • 10045
url
  • community/news/films/news20071204.html
Image Alt
  • Black-and-white photo of the upper half of a young man wearing a sweater with a large "P" on the front
Gender
  • Male
Position
Source
  • Inscription on Baker's tombstone.
  • —Eyewitness account of Baker's death by Cpt. Edwin H. Cooper, 26th Division Photographic Officer, United States Signal Corps
Quote
  • "Instead of running straight away to land he started to turn back toward the field. The wing slipped, the machine crashed and he was killed."
  • I think some day you may have flown too high,
  • It was no blundering fate that stooped and bade
  • So that immortals saw you and were glad,
  • Until they loved and called you, and you came.
  • Watching the beauty of your spirits flame,
  • With that swift look of those who know the sky,
  • You break your wings, and fall to earth and die,
  • You seemed winged, even as a lad,
Death
  • 1918-12-21
Birth
  • 1892-01-15
abstract
  • Baker was born in Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia. He attended St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire, where Malcolm Gordon was coach of the ice hockey team, and he graduated in 1909. In 1910, he enrolled in Princeton University. During his time there, he was elected to the Ivy Club, while also playing baseball, football, and hockey. Because Princeton's athletic rules limited athletes to participation in only two varsity sports, Baker gave up baseball after his freshman year to concentrate solely on football and hockey. By the time he graduated, he had led Princeton to a national championship in football (1911) and two national championships in hockey (1912 and 1914). Baker was also famous for his refusal to wear headgear in football and for the fact that he was penalized only once during his entire hockey career at Princeton. Following graduation, he worked at J. P. Morgan Bank in New York City and played for the St. Nicholas Club in Manhattan, one of the top amateur clubs in the United States. (There was no professional hockey in the eastern United States at that time.) When the country entered World War I in 1917, he enlisted in the U.S. Army as a pilot and left for Europe. By 1918, he was a member of the United States Army Air Service, commanding the 103rd Aero Squadron, whose members consisted mainly of veterans of the Lafayette Escadrille. He painted his Spad XIII orange-and-black in honor of his alma mater, Princeton. Contrary to the newspaper accounts of his day, however, Baker was not an ace. He had only three confirmed kills to his name, rather than the necessary five. He was, nonetheless, awarded the Croix de Guerre by the French government for his service. Just a few weeks after the armistice ending the war, he was killed in a plane crash near Toul while test-flying one of his squadron's newly repaired Spads. Ironically, his orders to return home to the United States were found tucked inside his jacket. He is buried in West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania.
  • Hobey Baker was an American pilot serving in the Lafayette Escadrille in World War I.
  • Hobart Amory Hare "Hobey" Baker (January 15, 1892 – December 21, 1918) was an American amateur athlete of the early twentieth century. Considered the first American star in ice hockey by the Hockey Hall of Fame, he was also an accomplished American football player. Born into a prominent family from Philadelphia, he enrolled at Princeton University in 1910. Baker excelled on the university's hockey and football teams, and became a noted amateur hockey player for the St. Nicholas Club in New York City. He was a member of three national championship teams, for football in 1911 and hockey in 1912 and 1914, and helped the St. Nicholas Club win a national amateur championship in 1915. Baker graduated from Princeton in 1914 and worked for J.P. Morgan Bank until he enlisted in the United States Army Air Service. During World War I he served with the 103rd and the 13th Aero Squadrons before being promoted to captain and named commander of the 141st Aero Squadron. Baker died in December 1918 after a plane he was test-piloting crashed, hours before he was due to leave France and return to America. Baker was widely regarded by his contemporaries as one of the best athletes of his time and is considered one of the best early American hockey players. When the Hockey Hall of Fame was founded in 1945, Baker was named one of the first nine inductees, the only American among them. In 1973 he became one of the initial inductees in the United States Hockey Hall of Fame. He was also inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1975, and is the only person to be in both the Hockey and College Football Halls of Fame. F. Scott Fitzgerald idolized Baker and included him as a minor character in the 1920 novel This Side of Paradise. In 1921, Princeton named its new hockey arena the Hobey Baker Memorial Rink. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the governing body of college sports in the United States, introduced the Hobey Baker Award in 1980; it is awarded annually to the best collegiate hockey player.