PropertyValue
rdf:type
rdfs:label
  • Lola Bunny
rdfs:comment
  • Performer(s) Appeared in Lola Bunny is a character from 's Looney Tunes franchise. She is an anthropomorphic female rabbit, created as a love interest to Bugs Bunny and introduced in the 1996 film Space Jam. Her depictions run the gamut from savvy equal to Bugs (as seen in DC's Looney Tunes comic book) to a complete Cloud Cuckoolander, bordering on insanity (as seen in The Looney Tunes Show).
  • Lola Bunny is an anthropomorphic, female and tomboy rabbit. According to Kevin Sandler in Reading the Rabbit: Explorations in Warner Bros. Animation, she was created as "female merchandising counterpart" to Bugs Bunny. She debuted as Bugs Bunny's girlfriend in the 1996 sports comedy film Space Jam.
  • Lola first appeared in the 1996 film Space Jam. She is shown with tan fur, blonde bangs, and wears a purple rubber band on both ears like a ponytail. She has aqua colored eyes. Lola is voiced by Kath Soucie in the film. Lola's Basketball skills get her a spot on the Tune Squad, in which the Looney Tunes characters battle the villainous Monstars for their freedom, with help from Michael Jordan.
  • Lola first appeared in the 1996 film Space Jam. She is shown with tan fur, blonde bangs, and wears a purple rubber band on both ears like a ponytail. She has aqua colored eyes. Lola is voiced by Kath Soucie in the film. Lola's basketball skills get her a spot on the Toon Squad, in which the Looney Tunes characters battle the villainous Monstars for their freedom, with help from Michael Jordan.
  • Lola Bunny is a fictional cartoon character from Warner Bros. Studios. She is a female rabbit and has been established as having a romantic involvement with Bugs Bunny. Lola is an updated version of Honey Bunny, Bugs Bunny's girlfriend who appeared in comics, merchandise and live shows in theaters since 1966.
  • Lola first appears in the film Space Jam, in which she is voiced by Kath Soucie. Lola's basketball skills got her a spot on the Toon Squad, in which the Looney Tunes characters battled the villainous Monstars for their freedom, with help from Michael Jordan. The Toon Squad was victorious, and Lola kindled a romance with Bugs. Although she had turned down his earlier advances, she saw him in a new light after he heroically saved her from injury by shoving her out of the path of a belly-flopping Monstar, getting himself painfully squashed. She thanks Bugs by giving him a kiss. At the end of the movie, they are officially a couple; when Michael Jordan tells Bugs to stay out of trouble, Bugs assures him he will (which prompts him to kiss Lola again). Lola excitedly cheers and pulls down a curt
  • Lola is a beautiful and sexy anthropomorphic rabbit and has been established as having a romantic involvement with Bugs Bunny, as well as being his main love interest and girlfriend. Lola is also a tomboy despite her beauty and sexiness. She has tan fur, blonde bangs, and wears a purple rubber band on both ears like a ponytail. She has aqua colored eyes and she is 3'2" tall. Lola first appears in the film, Space Jam, in which she is the tritagonist. She is voiced by Kath Soucie and by Britt McKillip in the animated series Baby Looney Tunes.
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Voice
Origin
  • Looney Tunes
Voiced by
  • Kath Soucie, Britt McKillip
First Appearance
  • Space Jam
New
Name
  • Lola Bunny
Caption
  • Artwork from The Looney Tunes Show
  • Lola Bunny as seen in Space Jam.
First
  • Space Jam
dbkwik:hero/property/wikiPageUsesTemplate
Created by
Image caption
  • Lola as she was seen in Space Jam.
Species
catchphrases
  • "Don't ever call me 'Doll'."
Gender
  • Female
Old
  • BeanFan112's version
Creator
  • BeanFan112
  • imomj1
  • Herschel Weingrod, Timothy Harris, Leo Benvenuti and Steve Rudnick
debut appearance
  • Space Jam
known friends
known rivals
  • Nerdlucks/Monstars, Mr. Swackhammer
first line
  • "Hey! I can help."
abstract
  • Lola Bunny is a fictional cartoon character from Warner Bros. Studios. She is a female rabbit and has been established as having a romantic involvement with Bugs Bunny. Lola is an updated version of Honey Bunny, Bugs Bunny's girlfriend who appeared in comics, merchandise and live shows in theaters since 1966. She somewhat resembles Babs Bunny, a character from "Tiny Toon Adventures". In the episode "Fields Of Honey" Babs complained that she didn't have a mentor like the other characters- Buster Bunny had Bugs Bunny, Plucky Duck had Daffy Duck, Hamton J. Pig had Porky Pig etc. Some have suggested that Lola might even be based on Babs Bunny, although aside from a physical resemblance they have little in common. Lola's first appearance and only major role (as an adult) was in the movie Space Jam, in which she was voiced by Kath Soucie. Lola's impressive basketball skills got her a spot on the Tune Squad, in which the Looney Tunes characters battled the villainous Monstars for their freedom, with help from Michael Jordan. The Tune Squad was victorious, and Lola kindled a romance with Bugs. Although she had turned down his earlier advances, she saw him in new light after he heroically saved her from injury by shoving her out of the path of a belly-flopping Monstar, getting himself painfully squashed in the process. Lola's presence in Space Jam sparked a considerable amount of controversy amongst Looney Tunes purists. Many argued that the entire movie was a failed attempt to "update" the classic characters to the tastes of modern audiences. Another argument is that Lola's character as a "strong, independent female" who was at the same time excessively seductive, and has no place among the fallible human characteristics of the rest of the Looney Tunes. (Throughout the entire movie, Lola suffers no injury, reverse or misfortune of any kind, on the court or off.) Also, some argue that Bugs already has an established sweetheart in Honey Bunny, and that Bugs' boorish and competitive behavior towards Lola are against his character. After Space Jam, Lola has made several appearances in video games (in fact, she even replaced Honey Bunny as the damsel in distress of the Bugs Bunny Crazy Castle series), and she regularly appears in solo stories in the monthly Looney Tunes comic published by DC Comics. Lola was also seen as the reporter in the 2000 direct-to-video movie "Tweety's High-Flying Adventure". An infant version of her is among the regular characters of Baby Looney Tunes. (Her relative obscurity was mentioned in the original commercial break cards, where the announcer says things like "Yes, Lola is cute, but I'm not sure who she is.") Also, in the cartoon series Loonatics Unleashed, the character of Lexi Bunny is a descendant of Lola and possibly Bugs. The controversy surrounding Lola is indirectly addressed in the film Looney Tunes: Back in Action, which was touted by director Joe Dante as repairing the damage done to the characters' personalities in Space Jam: Bugs pointedly asserts that he has no need for a female co-star, as he is fully capable of playing both male and female roles himself. Bugs then refers to Lola as "That tramp who's been trying to steal my thunder!" Warner Bros. Animation and Comics
  • Lola is a beautiful and sexy anthropomorphic rabbit and has been established as having a romantic involvement with Bugs Bunny, as well as being his main love interest and girlfriend. Lola is also a tomboy despite her beauty and sexiness. She has tan fur, blonde bangs, and wears a purple rubber band on both ears like a ponytail. She has aqua colored eyes and she is 3'2" tall. Lola first appears in the film, Space Jam, in which she is the tritagonist. She is voiced by Kath Soucie and by Britt McKillip in the animated series Baby Looney Tunes. Lola's basketball skills get her a spot on the Toon Squad, in which the Looney Tunes characters battle the villainous Nerdlucks/Monstars for their freedom, with help from Michael Jordan.
  • Performer(s) Appeared in Lola Bunny is a character from 's Looney Tunes franchise. She is an anthropomorphic female rabbit, created as a love interest to Bugs Bunny and introduced in the 1996 film Space Jam. Her depictions run the gamut from savvy equal to Bugs (as seen in DC's Looney Tunes comic book) to a complete Cloud Cuckoolander, bordering on insanity (as seen in The Looney Tunes Show).
  • Lola first appeared in the 1996 film Space Jam. She is shown with tan fur, blonde bangs, and wears a purple rubber band on both ears like a ponytail. She has aqua colored eyes. Lola is voiced by Kath Soucie in the film. Lola's Basketball skills get her a spot on the Tune Squad, in which the Looney Tunes characters battle the villainous Monstars for their freedom, with help from Michael Jordan. Although she initially had no interest in Bugs, repeatedly turning down his advances, her feelings shifted from platonic to romantic after he saved her from a belly-flopping Monstar, getting himself painfully squashed in the process (showing that he was willing to put himself in harm's way for her and genuinely cared for her). Acting on these feelings, she kissed him and near the film's end, becoming his girlfriend. Lola was created to serve as a Romantic interest for Bugs. While Bugs expressed "heterosexual desire" in previous films, his sexual orientation as described by Jonathan Romney involved polysexuality. Lola has a "curvaceous body", wears tight clothes, and poses seductively when she first appears on screen. In response, Bugs is instantly smitten and several other male characters ogle at her. Lola demonstrates her basketball skills and then the film makes use of a Tex Avery-style gag concerning the libido of males: Bugs floats up the air and then crashes to the floor. The scene is reminiscent of "Wolfie" from Red Hot Riding Hood (1943), a character defined by his lust for females. The effect serves to reduce Bugs and his fellow characters to stereotypical "guys". This adds to the film a sub-plot typical for the romantic comedy: will there be romance between Lola and Bugs? Lola does have a feminist catchphrase, "Don't call me doll", and her athleticism is not a typical feminine trait. But these traits are contradicted and undermined by the "rhythic swing of her cottontail" while showing off and the accompanying music. As Tony Cervone explained, the animators originally had in mind more "Tomboyish" traits for her, but feared that she would appear "too masculine". So they ended up emphasizing her "feminine attributes", and turned her into "a heterosexualized object". The romantic sub-plot of the film concludes with a conventional resolution. Lola is nearly injured by one of the opponents in the basketball game, and Bugs rescues the Damsel in distress. Bugs receives her grateful kiss during the game, and kisses her back following its end, with Lola reacting in her own Tex Avery-style gag on libido. Lola's personality is a combination of the Hawksian woman, Tomboy and femme fatale archetypes. She is a tough talking, no-nonsense woman who is extremely independent and self-reliant. She is highly athletic while also incredibly seductive in her behavior.
  • Lola first appeared in the 1996 film Space Jam. She is shown with tan fur, blonde bangs, and wears a purple rubber band on both ears like a ponytail. She has aqua colored eyes. Lola is voiced by Kath Soucie in the film. Lola's basketball skills get her a spot on the Toon Squad, in which the Looney Tunes characters battle the villainous Monstars for their freedom, with help from Michael Jordan. Although she initially turned down Bugs' advances, her feelings shifted to affection after he saved her from a belly-flopping Monstar, getting himself painfully squashed in the process (showing that he was willing to put himself in harm's way for her and genuinely cared for her). Acting on these feelings, she kissed him and near the film's end, becomes his girlfriend. Lola's personality is a combination of the Hawksian woman, tomboy and femme fatale archetypes. She is a tough talking, no-nonsense woman (as displayed by her reactions to being called the term "doll," which she finds to be derogatory and highly offensive, who is extremely independent and self reliant. She is highly athletic (easily the best player after Michael Jordan himself). She is also incredibly seductive in her behaviour, quite capable of easily charming men around her (as displayed with the other Looney Tunes in her first appearance in the movie but with none more so than Bugs Bunny himself, her love interest and boyfriend).
  • Lola Bunny is an anthropomorphic, female and tomboy rabbit. According to Kevin Sandler in Reading the Rabbit: Explorations in Warner Bros. Animation, she was created as "female merchandising counterpart" to Bugs Bunny. She debuted as Bugs Bunny's girlfriend in the 1996 sports comedy film Space Jam.
  • Lola first appears in the film Space Jam, in which she is voiced by Kath Soucie. Lola's basketball skills got her a spot on the Toon Squad, in which the Looney Tunes characters battled the villainous Monstars for their freedom, with help from Michael Jordan. The Toon Squad was victorious, and Lola kindled a romance with Bugs. Although she had turned down his earlier advances, she saw him in a new light after he heroically saved her from injury by shoving her out of the path of a belly-flopping Monstar, getting himself painfully squashed. She thanks Bugs by giving him a kiss. At the end of the movie, they are officially a couple; when Michael Jordan tells Bugs to stay out of trouble, Bugs assures him he will (which prompts him to kiss Lola again). Lola excitedly cheers and pulls down a curtain, transitioning to the next scene of the movie. An important personality trait of Lola is that she becomes very agitated and vengeful when she is referred to as "doll". This trait was originally taken from the character Barb Wire (played by Pamela Anderson), who has the same reaction from being called "babe".
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