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rdfs:label
  • Heads-up display
  • Heads-Up Display
rdfs:comment
  • A Heads-Up Display (HUD) is an attachment point on an avatar which allows an object to be visible only to the resident whose avatar it is attached to. There are 8 HUD attachment points that can be used. HUDs exist between the UI and the world. HUDs were introduced in Version 1.7 and allow residents to create UI-like elements.
  • The Heads-Up Display, or HUD, is an element that appears in every Kingdom Hearts game. It is almost always at the bottom of the screen—with the exclusion of Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories—and details multiple things. However, HP is always present in the HUD.
  • The Heads-Up Display, often abbreviated as the HUD, is a set of indicators used in the Manhunt series to show the player's health, weaponry, ammunition, stamina, time, score, the current stance of a protagonist, subtitles and the player's icon when hiding in the darkness.
  • A Heads-Up Display, or HUD, is the name given to the screen viewed by the player of a first-person shooter game.
  • Heads-Up Display, or often abbreviated as HUD is a set of indicators used in WARFRAME to show the player's current status in a game, as well as other important information at a glance. HUD features can be toggled in the Settings menu.
  • The Heads-up display, or HUD, is a system for quickly relaying important information to the user. It is a collection of various tabs surrounding the player's view in-game. A minimal version of the default HUD can be enabled in Advanced multiplayer options. The game also allows for the addition of HUD modification files (or "custom HUDs") to suit the players' taste (see section below).
  • In technology a heads-up display is a set of data that appears before a viewer without obstructing view. In the Doom games it consists of the status bar on the bottom of the screen and text that appears in the upper left corner of the screen, normally consisting of one-line text message in red lettering. A message is normally displayed in the following circumstances:
  • The Heads-Up Display (HUD) of Samus Aran's Visors acts much like any HUD in video gaming, providing her with features that help her progress safely in the environment she is exploring. It can be customized to lessen or remove visor and helmet opacity completely, leaving Samus with nothing on her HUD. The HUD provides Samus with a Radar, a Targeting Reticule, Charge Meter, energy gauge, Missile count, Threat Assessment, boss life meter, obtained Visors and Beams (in the Wii versions of the Prime Series, only the ones in current use are displayed). The HUD can be upgraded, at the cost of or addition of certain features, or even alteration.
  • The HUD is one of the most important aspect and source of in-game information for the player, displaying vital information and data regarding the player's current status. Throughout the Splinter Cell series, the HUD has gone through both subtle and drastic changes throughout the game series. Through all the games, however, some aspects of the HUD have remained through the series: current weapon information (ammo count), current health status and aiming indicator.
  • A HUD can be used to convey many different types of information, such as time, score (in some missions), money, health, armor, weaponry, ammunition, warnings (e.g. "wrong way" in a race) maps with blips and subtitles of conversations. The HUD GTA games may display the following information: Other elements appear on the HUD in other situations, such as a dialogue subtitles, help messages, and a "Busted" or "Wasted" sign if the player gets arrested or killed respectively.
  • HUDs were also sometimes installed in helmets to assist warriors or bounty hunters. The visors of Mandalorian helmets and clone commando helmets contained HUDs that provided information to the user and were capable of searching databases or uploading maps. The clones became somewhat dependent on the information the HUD gave them, and often felt handicapped when their helmets were off.
  • The HUD is the main source for information in-game in Halo: Combat Evolved, Halo 2, Halo 3, Halo 3: ODST, Halo: Reach, Halo 4, and Halo 5: Guardians, though the appearance of the HUD has changed dramatically from its predecessors. The sensors augmented into the Spartan's body display the soldier's vital signs, which include a measure of their overall health in the form of bars. Note that this "health bar" has been removed from Halo 2 and Halo 3, with the reason being the insertion of automatic biofoam injectors into the Mark VI armor. In Halo 3, there a slight convex appearance to simulate looking through a real visor. Also, the MJOLNIR shields flare up in a grid-shaped pattern, to simulate the player is taking damage. Additionally, the HUD also reports the strength of the wearer's shields
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dbkwik:callofduty/property/wikiPageUsesTemplate
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dbkwik:kingdom--hearts/property/wikiPageUsesTemplate
dbkwik:kingdomhearts/property/wikiPageUsesTemplate
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DE
  • Head-Up Display
ES
  • HUD
abstract
  • The HUD is the main source for information in-game in Halo: Combat Evolved, Halo 2, Halo 3, Halo 3: ODST, Halo: Reach, Halo 4, and Halo 5: Guardians, though the appearance of the HUD has changed dramatically from its predecessors. The sensors augmented into the Spartan's body display the soldier's vital signs, which include a measure of their overall health in the form of bars. Note that this "health bar" has been removed from Halo 2 and Halo 3, with the reason being the insertion of automatic biofoam injectors into the Mark VI armor. In Halo 3, there a slight convex appearance to simulate looking through a real visor. Also, the MJOLNIR shields flare up in a grid-shaped pattern, to simulate the player is taking damage. Additionally, the HUD also reports the strength of the wearer's shields through the energy signatures it emanates. Weapons' heat and ammunition levels, as well as grenade type and count are also detected through sensors placed in the Spartan's gloves. In Halo 2 and 3, the Mark VI armor is able to register two weapons when the Spartan is dual-wielding. Another notable feature on the HUD is that each type of weapon that the gloves detect has its own unique aiming reticle in relation to the type of ammo that it projects and it's statistics. Even heavy weapons have their own reticles. For example, the open circle reticle on the shotgun tells you that although the shot will land somewhere in the directed area, the distance and position are rather unpredictable. Or the Ghost's reticle tells you that the plasma shots will travel as far as the two dots show, but can drift off left or right a little. The reticle is also compatible with the scope of ranged weapons when installed. However, do remember that it is a reticle that is designed to aid the person in pinpointing where the shot will end up, while an aiming cursor shows exactly where the shot will end up. The motion sensor is another important feature displayed on the HUD. It can sense and track movement in a 15-meter radius (Halo: CE), a 20-meter radius (Halo 2) and a 25-meter radius (Halo 3). Due to the insertion of IFF tags in UNSC soldiers, the radar can distinguish friend (yellow) from foe (red). Finally, the way point indicators are an on-screen directive that point out important objectives or locations in the Spartan's mission, and are extremely useful, measuring the distance the Spartan is from the objective. A HUD is featured on SPI Armor, Mjolnir Armor, ODST battle armor, Marine Body Armor, and even the Sangheili Combat Harness.
  • A Heads-Up Display (HUD) is an attachment point on an avatar which allows an object to be visible only to the resident whose avatar it is attached to. There are 8 HUD attachment points that can be used. HUDs exist between the UI and the world. HUDs were introduced in Version 1.7 and allow residents to create UI-like elements.
  • A HUD can be used to convey many different types of information, such as time, score (in some missions), money, health, armor, weaponry, ammunition, warnings (e.g. "wrong way" in a race) maps with blips and subtitles of conversations. The HUD GTA games may display the following information: * Money. * Weapon selected and amount of ammunition. * Amount of health. * Amount of armor. * Mission title (GTA III onwards) when starting a mission. * Oxygen remaining (GTA San Andreas) or Stamina (GTA Vice City Stories) when in water. * Gang respect (GTA 2). * Player character stats and skills (GTA San Andreas). * Wanted Level. Starting with GTA San Andreas (except GTA Advance), the wanted level interface does not appear until the player has a wanted level. * Time (GTA III and later) (in Grand Theft Auto Advance, only when on foot), indicated by a 24-hour clock. * Vehicle speed (GTA Advance), in miles per hour. Replaces the time display when riding in a vehicle. * The vehicle the player enters. In GTA V, the vehicle name displayed in the lower right corner includes the car manufacturer, as well as its category (ex. Albany Cavalcade, SUVs). * The district the player enters. * The street the player enters (Grand Theft Auto IV). * Character's special ability meter (Grand Theft Auto V). * Location Compasses, compass points to key locations (GTA 1 to GTA 2). * A radar, a small map of the player's current location (GTA III onwards). Altitude meters are also integrated into the radar for GTA San Andreas and The Ballad of Gay Tony. Other elements appear on the HUD in other situations, such as a dialogue subtitles, help messages, and a "Busted" or "Wasted" sign if the player gets arrested or killed respectively.
  • The Heads-Up Display (HUD) of Samus Aran's Visors acts much like any HUD in video gaming, providing her with features that help her progress safely in the environment she is exploring. It can be customized to lessen or remove visor and helmet opacity completely, leaving Samus with nothing on her HUD. The HUD provides Samus with a Radar, a Targeting Reticule, Charge Meter, energy gauge, Missile count, Threat Assessment, boss life meter, obtained Visors and Beams (in the Wii versions of the Prime Series, only the ones in current use are displayed). The HUD can be upgraded, at the cost of or addition of certain features, or even alteration. In Metroid Prime 3: Corruption, Samus' Gunship contains a switch that, when scanned, says: "Switch primes the ship's weapon systems and activates the combat-targeting HUD." Each of the seven playable characters in Metroid Prime: Hunters has their own unique Heads-Up Display. They can be seen in the gallery below. Additionally, Federation Marines in Metroid Prime: Federation Force have their own HUD. The HUD throughout the series has four blue lights at the top. In the Wii games, they indicate the Wii Remote's battery life. If two lights remain, they become yellow, and red if one.
  • The Heads-Up Display, or HUD, is an element that appears in every Kingdom Hearts game. It is almost always at the bottom of the screen—with the exclusion of Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories—and details multiple things. However, HP is always present in the HUD.
  • HUDs were also sometimes installed in helmets to assist warriors or bounty hunters. The visors of Mandalorian helmets and clone commando helmets contained HUDs that provided information to the user and were capable of searching databases or uploading maps. The clones became somewhat dependent on the information the HUD gave them, and often felt handicapped when their helmets were off. Specifically, Boba Fett's helmet contained a very advanced HUD, which featured information on the surrounding environment as well as a 360-degree field of vision. In addition, an advanced radar allowed his HUD to provide information on nearby rooms, and could be used to scan the HoloNet and connect with databases, allowing him to perform tasks which would normally require a computer terminal, such as trading on the stock market and buying real estate, from anywhere that was accessible through the HoloNet.
  • The Heads-Up Display, often abbreviated as the HUD, is a set of indicators used in the Manhunt series to show the player's health, weaponry, ammunition, stamina, time, score, the current stance of a protagonist, subtitles and the player's icon when hiding in the darkness.
  • A Heads-Up Display, or HUD, is the name given to the screen viewed by the player of a first-person shooter game.
  • In technology a heads-up display is a set of data that appears before a viewer without obstructing view. In the Doom games it consists of the status bar on the bottom of the screen and text that appears in the upper left corner of the screen, normally consisting of one-line text message in red lettering. A message is normally displayed in the following circumstances: * An item has been picked up. * A key is needed to open a door or flip switch. * In multiplayer mode, a player has sent a message, or left the game. * A game mode (messages, detail, gamma) has been changed. * A cheat code has been activated. Messages are displayed for approximately four seconds and then disappear. The "Enter" key will re-display the previous message. The "F8" key will disable game-generated messages (and subsequently reenable them). ("F8" does not affect messages from other players.) In multiplayer mode, there is a second line in the heads-up display that is used to compose messages to be sent to the other players. The "T" key begins message composition, and a horizontal caret appears. A message may then be typed, and sent with the "Enter" key, or one of several predefined messages (known as "chat macros" or "chat strings") may be sent by holding "Alt" and pressing the assigned number key. If there are more than two players, a message may be sent to a single specific player by using the first letter of that player's color instead of "T" ("G" for green, "I" for indigo, "B" for brown and "R" for red). Many source ports have made enhancements to the heads-up display, such as scrolling message lines, additional game-generated messages, varying color and position of text, and modes that replace the status bar at the bottom with heads-up display data (commonly known as HUD mode).
  • Heads-Up Display, or often abbreviated as HUD is a set of indicators used in WARFRAME to show the player's current status in a game, as well as other important information at a glance. HUD features can be toggled in the Settings menu.
  • The Heads-up display, or HUD, is a system for quickly relaying important information to the user. It is a collection of various tabs surrounding the player's view in-game. A minimal version of the default HUD can be enabled in Advanced multiplayer options. The game also allows for the addition of HUD modification files (or "custom HUDs") to suit the players' taste (see section below).
  • The HUD is one of the most important aspect and source of in-game information for the player, displaying vital information and data regarding the player's current status. Throughout the Splinter Cell series, the HUD has gone through both subtle and drastic changes throughout the game series. Through all the games, however, some aspects of the HUD have remained through the series: current weapon information (ammo count), current health status and aiming indicator. In Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell and Splinter Cell: Pandora Tomorrow, the HUD remains very similar to each other (besides a few minor changes). The player's health is represented as a vertical bar on the right side of the screen. Below the bar lies the equipment (weapons/gadget) information, detailing the weapon ammunition count and gadget number. Above the equipment information box is the stealth meter, and above the stealth meter are OPSAT notifications letting the player know if they've received new Goals, Notes or Data, respectively. In the upper right side of the screen sits the communications box, which displays a text readout of ingoing and outgoing dialogue during the mission. The Interaction System is appears in the upper right area of the screen when the player is able to interact with the environment. In Splinter Cell: Chaos Theory, the HUD remains similar but, like Pandora Tomorrow, has undergone different changes. Now between the stealth meter and the equipment information box sits the sound meter, which indicates the current sound output the player is currently making (additionally, an empty white box tracks environmental noise separately). The health bar is now located in the upper right side of the screen and, instead of vertically, the health bar is now horizontal. In Splinter Cell: Double Agent (Version 1), the HUD is drastically different from the previous games. For one, the objective bar resides on the left side of the screen and a single colored dot (the stealth meter) is located on the left side of it. The Interaction System is represented by icons now and areas of the HUD (like the weapon/gadget information) is removed from the HUD when it isn't in use. In Splinter Cell: Conviction and Splinter Cell: Blacklist, the HUD is very minimalist, but the two games share a similar theme of removing HUD information on the screen. Weapon information moved back to the right side of the screen, and in Blacklist, the HUD can be enabled to disappear when it's not in use for a while.
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