PropertyValue
rdfs:label
  • First Amendment to the United States Constitution
rdfs:comment
  • Although the First Amendment explicitly prohibits only the named rights from being abridged by laws made by the Congress, the courts have interpreted it as applying more broadly. As the first sentence in the body of the Constitution reserves all legislative authority to the Congress, the courts have held that the First Amendment's terms also extend to the executive and judicial branches. Additionally, in the 20th century the Supreme Court has held that the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment "incorporates" the limitations of the First Amendment. That means that the restrictions of the First Amendment also apply to the states, including the local governments within each of those states.
owl:sameAs
dcterms:subject
dbkwik:freespeech/property/wikiPageUsesTemplate
abstract
  • Although the First Amendment explicitly prohibits only the named rights from being abridged by laws made by the Congress, the courts have interpreted it as applying more broadly. As the first sentence in the body of the Constitution reserves all legislative authority to the Congress, the courts have held that the First Amendment's terms also extend to the executive and judicial branches. Additionally, in the 20th century the Supreme Court has held that the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment "incorporates" the limitations of the First Amendment. That means that the restrictions of the First Amendment also apply to the states, including the local governments within each of those states.