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  • Alan Turing
  • Alan Turing
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  • During the war, he designed a Rift Predictor for Torchwood Three in 1941 (PROSE: The Twilight Streets) and cracked the code at Bletchley Park in spring of that year. (AUDIO: Criss-Cross) Although strictly confidential, WREN Constance Clarke was present that morning and knew the work was instrumental to the war effort, changing the tide of the war. (AUDIO: Criss-Cross) He helped the Eighth Doctor crack an alien code in 1944. (PROSE: The Turing Test) He committed suicide in the mid-1950s, after having been hounded out of academia by Professor Jeffrey Broderick. (AUDIO: Artificial Intelligence)
  • Alan Mathison Turing, OBE, FRS (pronounced /ˈtjʊərɪŋ/ TYOOR-ing; 23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954), was an English mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, and computer scientist. He was influential in the development of computer science and providing a formalization of the concept of the algorithm and computation with the Turing machine, playing a significant role in the creation of the modern computer. This article is a stub. You can help by [ expanding it].
  • Alan Mathison Turing was a British mathematician and theorist, and hailed as the father of computer science. He also was the man responsible for decrypting the Enigma device during World War II, ensuring a victory for the Allied Forces against Nazi Germany. He was also responsible for the Turing Test, which involved determining whether a computer or AI had "sentience" or not if they possessed a keen intellect, which was inspired by a party trick involving deducing whether written notes were made by a woman or a man posing as a woman.
  • Turing was an employee of Abstergo Industries and a member of the Templar Order. He was also a confidant of another Templar, John Maynard Keynes. During World War II, Turing worked for British intelligence, and was instrumental in cracking the code for the German Enigma machine. In 1952, the Templars had Turing arrested for gross indecency in an effort to silence him. When this failed, the Templars killed Turing on 7 June 1954, and made it appear as if Turing had killed himself with a cyanide-laced apple, taking care to make the death seem "poetic", as the engineer "always was theatrical".
  • Alan Turing (1912–1954) was the som of an English civil servant that worked in India. He attended boarding school at Sherbourne followed by a stint at Cambridge University. While there he studied mathematics under Newman, a professor whose interest lay in the field of mathematical logic. He became acquainted with two important papers published by the Austrian logician Kurt Gödel that were published around 1930 in the same field, which was an active one at the time. The subject of the papers was the Hilbert, or "decision" problem, asks if there is a given finite procedure to determine if a given Diophantine equation is solvable. After Cambridge, Turing went to Princeton University as it was the principal location where research into mathematical logic was occurring. In 1936 Turing presented
  • Alan Mathison Turing was a pioneering English computer scientist, mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst and theoretical biologist. He was highly influential in the development of theoretical computer science, providing a formalisation of the concepts of algorithm and computation with the Turing machine, which can be considered a model of a general purpose computer. Turing is widely considered to be the father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence.
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Appearances
Games
  • Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker
Birth Date
  • 1912-06-23
  • Maida Vaile, London, England
Branch
Origin
Age
  • Deceased
Name
  • Alan Turing
  • Special Agent Alan Turing
First
  • The Turing Test
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imagewidth
  • 120
Species
  • Human
death date
  • 1954-06-07
  • Wimslow, Cheshire, England
Occupation
  • Mathematician
Family
Gender
  • Male
Nationality
  • 22
last appear
  • N/A
first appear
  • N/A
abstract
  • Alan Turing (1912–1954) was the som of an English civil servant that worked in India. He attended boarding school at Sherbourne followed by a stint at Cambridge University. While there he studied mathematics under Newman, a professor whose interest lay in the field of mathematical logic. He became acquainted with two important papers published by the Austrian logician Kurt Gödel that were published around 1930 in the same field, which was an active one at the time. The subject of the papers was the Hilbert, or "decision" problem, asks if there is a given finite procedure to determine if a given Diophantine equation is solvable. After Cambridge, Turing went to Princeton University as it was the principal location where research into mathematical logic was occurring. In 1936 Turing presented a model of computing known as the "Turing Machine", which along with Gödel's 1931 "Incompleteness Theorem" was an extremely important negative result in mathematics. Other important results in the area were obtained by Alonzo Church and Post. In 1939 the Second World War broke out and Turing became involved in classified deciphering efforts at Bletchley Park in the United Kingdom. Through analysis of a ciphering machine used by the Germans, known as the Enigma cipher, that was captured by the Polish military, he was able to break the cipher. This had profound military implications and altered the course of the war to the favour of the Allies. Due to the exigencies of war it was necessary to crack ciphertext quickly; decrypting the contents of a message containing the time and location of an attach is not useful after the fact. At Bletchly the Colossus decoding machine was built to assist in decoding ciphertext. The engineering expertise gained in it's construction was later applied to the development of computers. After the war, Turing returned to Cambridge in order to work on computing until 1948. He then left for the University of Manchester where he remained until he committed suicide in 1952. Aside: the first real stored-program computer in Canada, a Ferret model, was obtained by the University of Toronto from the University of Manchester in 1950. Turing also worked on: * Artificial intelligence (1950 paper described the so-called Turing Test) * Theoretical computation * Decryption * Computers Cf. the biography of Turing written by Hodge, a British mathematician active in the gay rights movement, as well as the film Breaking the Code.
  • Alan Mathison Turing was a British mathematician and theorist, and hailed as the father of computer science. He also was the man responsible for decrypting the Enigma device during World War II, ensuring a victory for the Allied Forces against Nazi Germany. He was also responsible for the Turing Test, which involved determining whether a computer or AI had "sentience" or not if they possessed a keen intellect, which was inspired by a party trick involving deducing whether written notes were made by a woman or a man posing as a woman. During Dr. Strangelove's childhood, since she was ten years old, she frequently paid a visit to Turing's home to learn mathematics from him. She held a lot of respect for him and also viewed him as "different" than the other people she interacted with, although she never knew the reason until after his death. Although hailed as a hero for his role in ending World War II with an Allied victory, Turing was eventually arrested and plead guilty to committing acts of homosexuality, which at the time was illegal in the United Kingdom. He accepted treatment with female hormones (chemical castration) as an alternative to prison. Turing died in 1954, 16 days before his 42nd birthday, from cyanide poisoning. An inquest determined his death a suicide; his mother and some others believed it was accidental. The viability of the Turing Test as a measure of a machine's "intelligence" has received criticism from both philosophers and computer scientists, including John Searle in 1980.
  • During the war, he designed a Rift Predictor for Torchwood Three in 1941 (PROSE: The Twilight Streets) and cracked the code at Bletchley Park in spring of that year. (AUDIO: Criss-Cross) Although strictly confidential, WREN Constance Clarke was present that morning and knew the work was instrumental to the war effort, changing the tide of the war. (AUDIO: Criss-Cross) He helped the Eighth Doctor crack an alien code in 1944. (PROSE: The Turing Test) He committed suicide in the mid-1950s, after having been hounded out of academia by Professor Jeffrey Broderick. (AUDIO: Artificial Intelligence)
  • Alan Mathison Turing, OBE, FRS (pronounced /ˈtjʊərɪŋ/ TYOOR-ing; 23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954), was an English mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, and computer scientist. He was influential in the development of computer science and providing a formalization of the concept of the algorithm and computation with the Turing machine, playing a significant role in the creation of the modern computer. During the Second World War, Turing worked for the Government Code and Cypher School at Bletchley Park, Britain's codebreaking centre. For a time he was head of Hut 8, the section responsible for German naval cryptanalysis. He devised a number of techniques for breaking German ciphers, including the method of the bombe, an electromechanical machine that could find settings for the Enigma machine. After the war he worked at the UK National Physical Laboratory, where he created one of the first designs for a stored-program computer, the Automatic Computing Engine (ACE). Towards the end of his life Turing became interested in chemistry. He wrote a paper on the chemical basis of morphogenesis, and he predicted oscillating chemical reactions such as the Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction, which were first observed in the 1960s. Turing's homosexuality resulted in a criminal prosecution in 1952—homosexual acts were illegal in the United Kingdom at that time—and he accepted treatment with female hormones, (chemical castration), as an alternative to prison. He died in 1954, several weeks before his 42nd birthday, from an apparently self-administered cyanide poisoning, although his mother (and some others) considered his death to be accidental. On 10 September 2009, following an Internet campaign, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown made an official public apology on behalf of the British government for the way in which Turing was treated after the war. This article is a stub. You can help by [ expanding it].
  • Alan Mathison Turing was a pioneering English computer scientist, mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst and theoretical biologist. He was highly influential in the development of theoretical computer science, providing a formalisation of the concepts of algorithm and computation with the Turing machine, which can be considered a model of a general purpose computer. Turing is widely considered to be the father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence. During the Second World War, Turing worked for the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS) at Bletchley Park, Britain's codebreaking centre. For a time he led Hut 8, the section responsible for German naval cryptanalysis. He devised a number of techniques for breaking German ciphers, including improvements to the pre-war Polish bombe method and an electromechanical machine that could find settings for the Enigma machine. Turing played a pivotal role in cracking intercepted coded messages that enabled the Allies to defeat the Nazis in many crucial engagements, including the Battle of the Atlantic; it has been estimated that this work shortened the war in Europe by as many as four years.
  • Turing was an employee of Abstergo Industries and a member of the Templar Order. He was also a confidant of another Templar, John Maynard Keynes. During World War II, Turing worked for British intelligence, and was instrumental in cracking the code for the German Enigma machine. Though it was publicly announced that Turing would attempt to build a robot, his contractors directed him not to actually build one, and to simply fake it for the press. This was because the Templars leading Abstergo feared that genuine robots would lead to mass unemployment, and a drop in the human birth rate. Turing, however, chose to ignore this directive. In 1952, the Templars had Turing arrested for gross indecency in an effort to silence him. When this failed, the Templars killed Turing on 7 June 1954, and made it appear as if Turing had killed himself with a cyanide-laced apple, taking care to make the death seem "poetic", as the engineer "always was theatrical".