PropertyValue
rdf:type
rdfs:label
  • Evil Clown
  • Evil clown
rdfs:comment
  • The Evil Clown is a minor villain in The Brave Little Toaster. The only word he says other than demented laughter is "Run!"
  • The Evil Clown is a minor villain in The Brave Little Toaster. The only word he says other than demented laughter is "Run."
  • Evil Clown Is a 2013 Horror Slasher Film Starring Lilly Collins, Taylor Lautner, Joseph Cross, Scout Taylor-Compton, Alexandra Daddario, Imogen Poots, Nico Tortorella, Kellan Lutz, Thomas Dekker, Katie Cassidy, Matt Prokop, Danielle Panabaker, Aimee Teegarden, Jennifer Pudavick, Amber Heard, Alexander Ludwig and Katrina Bowden.
  • The image of the evil clown is a development in American popular culture, in which the playful trope of the clown is rendered as disturbing through the use of horror elements and dark humor.
  • The Evil Clown is a sinister clown who tells the viewers in an eerie voice to look at his "lovely" hat. He is surprised by the appearance of the banana, who thinks the hat is a fine one.
  • The Evil Clowns are vampiric lamprey-like creatures disguised as clowns that devour victims when they laugh. A nest of five were captured by the Extreme Ghostbusters.
  • The modern archetype of the evil clown has unclear origins; the stock character appeared infrequently during the 19th Century, in such works as Edgar Allan Poe's Hop-Frog, which is believed by Jack Morgan, of the University of Missouri-Rolla, to draw upon an earlier incident "at a masquerade ball," in the 14th Century, during which "the king and his frivolous party, costumed—in highly flammable materials—as simian creatures, were ignited by a flambeau and incinerated, the King narrowly escaping in the actual case." Evil clowns also occupied a small niche in drama, appearing in the 1874 work La femme de Tabarin by Catulle Mendès and in Ruggero Leoncavallo's Pagliacci (accused of being a plagiarism of Mendès' piece), both works featuring murderous clowns as central characters.
owl:sameAs
Appeared
Alignment
  • Bad
Goal
  • To kill the Toaster
dcterms:subject
Dislikes
  • Apparently, toasters
  • Ceasing to exist
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Inspiration
  • Fireman Clowns from Dumbo
Voice
Likes
  • Looking evil and scary
Appearance
  • Slender clown with a devil's horns dressed as a firefighter
  • Slender clown with a devil's horns and dressed like a firefighter
Name
  • Evil Clown
Personality
  • Evil, mad, sinister, menacing, threatening, mean, scary, creepy, cunning, ruthless, dangerous, impatient, diabolical, manipulative, snide, egotistical, obnoxious, impolite, cruel
  • Evil, mad, sinister, menacing, threatening, mean, scary, creepy
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Fate
  • Is only a dream
Alias
  • Scary Clown
  • Firefighter Clown
Weapons
  • Hose, forks
Enemies
Image size
  • 225
animator
Character
  • Evil Clown
Occupation
  • Nightmare
  • Laughter Vampire
Films
  • The Brave Little Toaster
Quote
  • "Run."
  • "Run!"
  • *[laughing evily]*
abstract
  • The Evil Clown is a minor villain in The Brave Little Toaster. The only word he says other than demented laughter is "Run!"
  • The Evil Clown is a minor villain in The Brave Little Toaster. The only word he says other than demented laughter is "Run."
  • Evil Clown Is a 2013 Horror Slasher Film Starring Lilly Collins, Taylor Lautner, Joseph Cross, Scout Taylor-Compton, Alexandra Daddario, Imogen Poots, Nico Tortorella, Kellan Lutz, Thomas Dekker, Katie Cassidy, Matt Prokop, Danielle Panabaker, Aimee Teegarden, Jennifer Pudavick, Amber Heard, Alexander Ludwig and Katrina Bowden.
  • The image of the evil clown is a development in American popular culture, in which the playful trope of the clown is rendered as disturbing through the use of horror elements and dark humor.
  • The Evil Clown is a sinister clown who tells the viewers in an eerie voice to look at his "lovely" hat. He is surprised by the appearance of the banana, who thinks the hat is a fine one.
  • The Evil Clowns are vampiric lamprey-like creatures disguised as clowns that devour victims when they laugh. A nest of five were captured by the Extreme Ghostbusters.
  • The modern archetype of the evil clown has unclear origins; the stock character appeared infrequently during the 19th Century, in such works as Edgar Allan Poe's Hop-Frog, which is believed by Jack Morgan, of the University of Missouri-Rolla, to draw upon an earlier incident "at a masquerade ball," in the 14th Century, during which "the king and his frivolous party, costumed—in highly flammable materials—as simian creatures, were ignited by a flambeau and incinerated, the King narrowly escaping in the actual case." Evil clowns also occupied a small niche in drama, appearing in the 1874 work La femme de Tabarin by Catulle Mendès and in Ruggero Leoncavallo's Pagliacci (accused of being a plagiarism of Mendès' piece), both works featuring murderous clowns as central characters. The modern stock character of the evil clown was popularized by Stephen King's novel "It", which was the first to introduce the fear of an evil clown to a modern audience. Another one of the first appearances of the concept is that of John Wayne Gacy, an American serial killer and rapist who became known as the Killer Clown after it was discovered that he performed as Pogo the Clown at children's parties and other events. The public nature of his trial made the imprint of his character on American culture noteworthy, including his association with his clown persona. The evil clown archetype plays strongly off the sense of dislike caused by inherent elements of coulrophobia; however, it has been suggested by Joseph Durwin that the concept of evil clowns have an independent position in popular culture, arguing that "the concept of evil clowns and the widespread hostility it induces is a cultural phenomenon which transcends just the phobia alone". A study by the University of Sheffield concluded "that clowns are universally disliked by children. Some found them quite frightening and unknowable." This may be because of the nature of clowns' makeup hiding their faces, making them potential threats in disguise; as a psychology professor at California State University, Northridge stated, young children are "very reactive to a familiar body type with an unfamiliar face". This natural disliking of clowns makes them effective to use in a literary or fictional context, as the antagonistic threat perceived in clowns is desirable in a villainous character.
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