PropertyValue
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  • Bat-embargo
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  • During a long time, it was unclear who enacted the embargo, but it was commonly believed to be either DC Comics or Warner Bros. In 2007, it was revealed via The World's Finest that DC Comics writer Paul Levitz was the one who enacted the embargo. The reason Levitz supplied is that with the coming of The Batman, children (their target demographic) would be confused to see two different versions of the same characters at the same time.
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abstract
  • During a long time, it was unclear who enacted the embargo, but it was commonly believed to be either DC Comics or Warner Bros. In 2007, it was revealed via The World's Finest that DC Comics writer Paul Levitz was the one who enacted the embargo. The reason Levitz supplied is that with the coming of The Batman, children (their target demographic) would be confused to see two different versions of the same characters at the same time. This reasoning does not explain everything associated with the embargo. A number of Batman characters reserved never saw use in The Batman (i.e., Two-Face, Ra's al Ghul, the Scarecrow, and the Mad Hatter), most likely because they were to be used in the Christopher Nolan movies (except the Mad Hatter). It also does not explain why other heroes were also banned. Nor does it explain why Batman himself was allowed to continue appearing in Justice League Unlimited. These questions present (but by no means confirm) the possibility that there were other reasons involved in the ban.