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  • Tex Avery
  • Tex Avery
rdfs:comment
  • His voice actor is Billy West (desite that his name wasn't and the credits along side that other voices that were in the show).
  • __NOEDITSECTION__ Image:Information-silk.png|Character Template rect 0 0 20 20 Staff Template desc none Tex Avery Real Name Unknown First publication Unknown
  • Frederick Bean "Texas/Fred/Tex" Avery (b. February 26, 1908-d. August 26, 1980) was an American animator, cartoonist, voice actor and director, famous for producing animated cartoons during The Golden Age of Hollywood animation. He did his most significant work for the Warner Bros. and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios, creating the characters of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Droopy, Screwy Squirrel, and developing Porky Pig, Chilly Willy (this last one for the Walter Lantz Studio) into the personas for which they are remembered.
  • Avery's style of directing encouraged animators to stretch the boundaries of the medium to do things in a cartoon that could not be done in the world of live-action film. An often-quoted line about Avery's cartoons was, "In a cartoon you can do anything."[2] He also performed a great deal of voice work in his cartoons, usually throwaway bits (e.g. the Santa Claus seen briefly in "Who Killed Who?"), but Tex also voiced Junior from George and Junior and occasionally filled in for Bill Thompson as Droopy.
  • Tex Avery was an American cartoonist and animator responsible for creating or developing some of the most prolific cartoon characters in the history of animated cinema. Some of these characters include, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Bugs Bunny, Droopy, Screwball Squirrel, and Chilly Willy. His influence was found in almost all of the animated cartoon series by various studios in the 1940s and 1950s.
  • Frederick Bean "Fred/Tex" Avery (February 26, 1908 – August 26, 1980) was an American animator, cartoonist, voice actor and director, famous for producing animated cartoons during The Golden Age of Hollywood animation. He did his most significant work for the Warner Bros. and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios, creating the characters of Daffy Duck, Bugs Bunny, Droopy, Screwy Squirrel, and developing Porky Pig and Chilly Willy (this last one for the Walter Lantz Studio) into the personas for which they are remembered.
  • Avery tryed to be a graduate of the Chicago Institute of Filmography, but when they found out he had aids they kicked him out, So he killed some hobo and stole his camera which he used to make silent films, thus being able to make a huge profit by using an antiquated camera and unused stocks of cinefilm for a brief subject that, even if it bombed, would make money that Avery had never spent. In 1919, Avery joined 20th Century Fox, agreeing to mass-produce several thrillers for them based on existing novels around at the time. Those he produced included:
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DOD
  • 1980-08-26
Birth Date
  • 1908-02-26
death place
Country
  • USA
Name
  • Tex Avery
  • Avery, Tex
  • Frederick Bean "Tex" Avery
DOB
  • 1908-02-26
dbkwik:hanna-barbera/property/wikiPageUsesTemplate
dbkwik:fr.illogicopedia/property/wikiPageUsesTemplate
Years Active
  • 1930
Date of Death
  • 1980-08-26
Birth Place
Cause of Death
  • Liver cancer
death date
  • 1980-08-26
bgcolour
  • silver
Alternate names
  • Fred Avery
Place of Birth
Place of death
Died
  • 1980-08-26
  • Burbank, California
Studio
Occupation(s)
  • Director, animator, cartoonist, voice actor
ID
  • 813
Films
  • Haunted Mouse, Aviation Vacation, Of Fox and Hounds
Born
  • 20
  • 1908-02-26
  • Frederick Bean Avery
Date of Birth
  • 1908-02-26
Birth name
  • Frederick Bean Avery
PersonalHistory
  • Frederick Bean "Tex" Avery was an American animator, cartoonist, voice actor and director, famous for producing animated cartoons during The Golden Age of Hollywood animation. He did his most significant work for the Warner Bros. and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios, creating the characters of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Droopy, Screwy Squirrel, and developing Porky Pig, Chilly Willy into the personas for which they are remembered.
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abstract
  • Avery tryed to be a graduate of the Chicago Institute of Filmography, but when they found out he had aids they kicked him out, So he killed some hobo and stole his camera which he used to make silent films, thus being able to make a huge profit by using an antiquated camera and unused stocks of cinefilm for a brief subject that, even if it bombed, would make money that Avery had never spent. In 1919, Avery joined 20th Century Fox, agreeing to mass-produce several thrillers for them based on existing novels around at the time. Those he produced included: * The Case of the Bloody Knife (1919) * The Mystery of the Patch of Blood on the Newspaper (1920) * Shirelock Homeless versus Prof. Moronity (1920) * The Swinging Yarn Noose (1920) All of these, by today's standards, are utter crap that are about as exciting as reading a database of barcodes for Anti-Freeze bottles.
  • His voice actor is Billy West (desite that his name wasn't and the credits along side that other voices that were in the show).
  • Frederick Bean "Texas/Fred/Tex" Avery (b. February 26, 1908-d. August 26, 1980) was an American animator, cartoonist, voice actor and director, famous for producing animated cartoons during The Golden Age of Hollywood animation. He did his most significant work for the Warner Bros. and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios, creating the characters of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Droopy, Screwy Squirrel, and developing Porky Pig, Chilly Willy (this last one for the Walter Lantz Studio) into the personas for which they are remembered. Avery's influence can be seen in almost all of the animated cartoon series by various studios in the 1940s and 1950s. Gary Morris described Avery's innovative approach: "Above all, [Avery] steered the Warner Bros. house style away from Disney-esque sentimentality and made cartoons that appealed equally to adults, who appreciated Avery's speed, sarcasm, and irony, and to kids, who liked the nonstop action. Disney's "cute and cuddly" creatures, under Avery's guidance, were transformed into unflappable wits like Bugs Bunny, endearing buffoons like Porky Pig, or dazzling crazies like Daffy Duck. Even the classic fairy tale, a market that Disney had cornered, was appropriated by Avery, who made innocent heroines like Red Riding Hood into sexy jazz babies, more than a match for any Wolf. Avery also endeared himself to intellectuals by constantly breaking through the artifice of the cartoon, having characters leap out of the end credits, loudly object to the plot of the cartoon they were starring in, or speak directly to the audience." Avery's style of directing encouraged animators to stretch the boundaries of the medium to do things in a cartoon that could not be done in the world of live-action film. An often-quoted line about Avery's cartoons was, "In a cartoon you can do anything." He also performed a great deal of voice work in his cartoons, usually throwaway bits (e.g. the Santa Claus seen briefly in "Who Killed Who?"), but Tex did fill in for Bill Thompson as Droopy, although the individual cartoons where Avery did this have never been specified.
  • Tex Avery was an American cartoonist and animator responsible for creating or developing some of the most prolific cartoon characters in the history of animated cinema. Some of these characters include, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Bugs Bunny, Droopy, Screwball Squirrel, and Chilly Willy. His influence was found in almost all of the animated cartoon series by various studios in the 1940s and 1950s. The time during which he made his greatest contributions is often referred to as the Golden Age of Hollywood Animation due to the advent of sound cartoons and the popularity of the medium between roughly 1928 and 1945. The majority of his work was done for Warner Brothers and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios. His influence on contemporary animation is arguably unmatched with many of his characters retaining their icon status some 60 years since their creation. One of his most recognizable characters is an unnamed sexpot who first appeared in Red Hot Riding Hood and is frequently chased and desired by an unsavory wolf character. Avery died while working at Hanna-Barbera Studios at the age of 72 due to complications from lung cancer. In the years prior to his death he was growing steadily more depressed as his fortunes slightly faded with the popularity of his characters.
  • __NOEDITSECTION__ Image:Information-silk.png|Character Template rect 0 0 20 20 Staff Template desc none Tex Avery Real Name Unknown First publication Unknown
  • Frederick Bean "Fred/Tex" Avery (February 26, 1908 – August 26, 1980) was an American animator, cartoonist, voice actor and director, famous for producing animated cartoons during The Golden Age of Hollywood animation. He did his most significant work for the Warner Bros. and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios, creating the characters of Daffy Duck, Bugs Bunny, Droopy, Screwy Squirrel, and developing Porky Pig and Chilly Willy (this last one for the Walter Lantz Studio) into the personas for which they are remembered. Avery's influence can be seen in almost all of the animated cartoon series by various studios in the 1940s and 1950s. Gary Morris described Avery's innovative approach: "Above all, [Avery] steered the Warner Bros. house style away from Disneyesque sentimentality and made cartoons that appealed equally to adults, who appreciated Avery's speed, sarcasm, and irony, and to kids, who liked the nonstop action. Disney's "cute and cuddly" creatures, under Avery's guidance, were transformed into unflappable wits like Bugs Bunny, endearing buffoons like Porky Pig, or dazzling crazies like Daffy Duck. Even the classic fairy tale, a market that Disney had cornered, was appropriated by Avery, who made innocent heroines like Red Riding Hood into sexy jazz babies, more than a match for any Wolf. Avery also endeared himself to intellectuals by constantly breaking through the artifice of the cartoon, having characters leap out of the end credits, loudly object to the plot of the cartoon they were starring in, or speak directly to the audience." Avery's style of directing encouraged animators to stretch the boundaries of the medium to do things in a cartoon that could not be done in the world of live-action film. An often-quoted line about Avery's cartoons was, "In a cartoon you can do anything," . He also performed a great deal of voice work in his cartoons, usually throwaway bits (e.g. the Santa Claus seen briefly in Who Killed Who?), but Tex did fill in for Bill Thompson as Droopy, although the individual cartoons where Avery did this have never been specified.
  • Avery's style of directing encouraged animators to stretch the boundaries of the medium to do things in a cartoon that could not be done in the world of live-action film. An often-quoted line about Avery's cartoons was, "In a cartoon you can do anything."[2] He also performed a great deal of voice work in his cartoons, usually throwaway bits (e.g. the Santa Claus seen briefly in "Who Killed Who?"), but Tex also voiced Junior from George and Junior and occasionally filled in for Bill Thompson as Droopy. In 1996 Cartoon Network produced an animated showcase series that featured MGM and WB cartoons created by Avery, titled The Tex Avery Show. The series aired on the network until June 2004, when it was moved to Cartoon Network's sister network Boomerang.
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