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  • Graeae
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  • The Greaae (English translation: "old women", "grey ones", or "grey witches"; alternatively spelled Graiai (Γραῖαι) and Graiae) were three sisters who shared one eye and one tooth among them. They are one of several trios of archaic goddesses in Greek mythology. Their names were Deino, Enyo, and Pemphredo.
  • In Greek mythology, the Graeae (sing. Graea) were a group of sisters, the offspring of Ceto and Phorcys. Their names are Deino, Enyo and Pemphredo. They are one of many trios of goddesses in Greek Mythology, much like the Gorgon sisters. They took the form of old, grey-haired women. Like many sets of old crones in mythology, they all shared one eye and one tooth. They were the goddesses of old age, even though they were also classified as monsters. Because of this, they were given no power or regard by the other gods.
  • Their age was so great that a human childhood for them was hardly conceivable. Hesiod reports their names as Deino (Δεινώ "dread", the dreadful anticipation of horror), Enyo (Ἐνυώ "horror" the "waster of cities" who also had an identity separate from this sisterhood) and Pemphredo (Πεμφρηδώ "alarm"). Hyginus adds a fourth, Persis (Περσις "destroyer, slayer") or Perso (Περσώ).
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Status
  • Alive
Country
  • Greece
Name
  • Graeae
Caption
  • Goddesses of Old Age
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Mythology
  • Greek
Siblings
Parents
  • Ceto and Phorcys
Size
  • 300
abstract
  • Their age was so great that a human childhood for them was hardly conceivable. Hesiod reports their names as Deino (Δεινώ "dread", the dreadful anticipation of horror), Enyo (Ἐνυώ "horror" the "waster of cities" who also had an identity separate from this sisterhood) and Pemphredo (Πεμφρηδώ "alarm"). Hyginus adds a fourth, Persis (Περσις "destroyer, slayer") or Perso (Περσώ). Like another set of crones at the oldest levels of both Germanic and Norse mythology, they shared one eye and one tooth, which they took turns using. By stealing their eye while they were passing amongst themselves, the hero Perseus forced them to tell the whereabouts of the three objects needed to kill Medusa (in other versions the whereabouts of Medusa herself), by ransoming their shared eye for the information. One might compare the Graeae with the three spinners of Destiny, (the Moirai); the northern European Norns; or the Baltic goddess Laima and her two sisters; though all are distinct trios.[[
  • The Greaae (English translation: "old women", "grey ones", or "grey witches"; alternatively spelled Graiai (Γραῖαι) and Graiae) were three sisters who shared one eye and one tooth among them. They are one of several trios of archaic goddesses in Greek mythology. Their names were Deino, Enyo, and Pemphredo.
  • In Greek mythology, the Graeae (sing. Graea) were a group of sisters, the offspring of Ceto and Phorcys. Their names are Deino, Enyo and Pemphredo. They are one of many trios of goddesses in Greek Mythology, much like the Gorgon sisters. They took the form of old, grey-haired women. Like many sets of old crones in mythology, they all shared one eye and one tooth. They were the goddesses of old age, even though they were also classified as monsters. Because of this, they were given no power or regard by the other gods. Perseus seeks out the Graeae and forces them to reveal the location of Medusa's lair by stealing their common eye.
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