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  • Alan Moore
  • Alan Moore
  • Alan Moore
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  • Alan Moore ist ein britischer Comic-Autor. Er schrieb folgende Doctor Who-Comicgeschichten: * Black Legacy * Business as Usual * Star Death * Black Sun Rising * 4-D War Berühmt wurde Alan Moore als Autor mit der Comic-Reihe Die Liga der außergewöhnlichen Gentlemen, in der er mehrfach Bezüge zum Doctor Who-Universum einbaute.
  • Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953) is an English writer known for work in comics, including the acclaimed comic book series Watchmen, V for Vendetta, From Hell and Batman: The Killing Joke. He voiced himself in "Husbands and Knives".
  • Alan Moore (Northampton, 18 de noviembre de 1953) es un guionista de historietas británico conocido por obras maestras del cómic. Llego a ser catalogado como el «Mejor Escritor de Historietas de la Historia».
  • Alan Oswald Moore (discovered 18 November 1953, somewhere in England by Fleetway Publishing) is one of the world's top ranking 13th level wizards. He has also been known to write comics while recovering from stints of summoning vast rampaging hordes of absinthe-driven lesbians to do his bidding, and sometimes his laundry. Few know he is actually based on the Golden Age hero Alane Moor.
  • Alan Moore appeared in Coronation Street between July 1989 and February 1990 as Maurice Jones, the father of Steph Barnes and the builder of the non-terraced site of the street. He also appeared in The Wednesday Play, Nearest and Dearest Chessgame, Bulman, Robin of Sherwood and had a regular role in early 1970s drama Owen M.D..
  • In Greek religion and mythology, Alan Moore (/ˈælən mʊɹ/; Ancient Greek: Πάν) is the god of the suburban wilderness, guardians/watchmen, swamps, Hell, humanoid bats, masques, nature, and companion of lost girls. His name originates within the Marathi language, (from the word सूड व्ही, meaning "V for Vendetta.") He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat, in the same manner as a faun or satyr, and an enormous satyrian beard. With his homeland in rustic England, he is also recognized as the god of English countrysides, Scottish moors (hence his name), Kansas fields and lost girls. Moore is connected to fertility and the season of spring. The ancient Greeks also considered Alan Moore to be the god of criticism of interpretations of his own work.
  • Alan Moore got his start writing some crap involving the Time Lords getting in a war in time that never went anywhere. He was also Andrew Cartmel's favorite writer. Cartmel tried to get him to write for Doctor Who, but Moore said that all the post-Hartnell Doctors were too pedophilic for his tastes. It's a fair assumption that he wasn't watching season 24 anyways, like most people in the world.
  • Originally a cartoonist, Moore decided he couldn't make a living in that fashion and began his career in writing. Working with Marvel comics, Moore wrote scripts for Marvel UK, continuing work on Captain Britain, and also work on 2000 AD. The most famous of his early works was the V for Vendetta series. He was hired in 1983 to write DC's Swamp Thing in which he introduced John Constantine who was later given his own series, Hellblazer. He also wrote his infamous story on the Joker called The Killing Joke.
  • __NOEDITSECTION__ Image:Information-silk.png|Character Template rect 0 0 20 20 Staff Template desc none Alan Moore File:Moore.jpg Gallery Real Name Alan Moore Pseudonyms Curt Vile, Jill de Ray, Translucia Baboon Employers [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [
  • Alan Moore is a crazy man. An entertaining crazy man, that. He was once a great comic book writer, who wrote numerous comics. Several of his titles include Watchmen, V for Vendetta and has done work on Batman and Superman. He has a lot of concerns and views when it comes to his work.He doesn't like people making films based off his comics, and hates when other authors write for comics he made. He did the same exact thing with The League of Extraodinary Gentlemen. He also believes in magic (Yes, that's right. Magic. As in the magic in Harry Potter.) He claims to worship a giant snake.
  • He was later regarded as one of the most acclaimed comic book writers of all time and profoundly influenced late 1980s Doctor Who era script editor Andrew Cartmel, who asked him to submit story ideas to him. Scenes from Moore's The Ballad of Halo Jones had an influence on the Doctor Who stories Paradise Towers, Dragonfire and The Greatest Show in the Galaxy as Cartmel had shown to script writers as an example of the style of story he wanted to, in part, emulate. His daughter, Leah Moore, has co-scripted The Whispering Gallery for IDW Publishing.
  • Alan Moore is an acclaimed and award-winning British author, comic book writer, and magician who worships the ancient Roman snake god Glycon and who currently lives in Northampton, England. Among Moore's impressive list of works are From Hell, V for Vendetta, Watchmen, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Voice of the Fire, and Lost Girls. Moore is noted for both the quality of his writing and his complete and utter disdain for the commercialization of his works, particularly the adaptation of his writing into film.
  • Probably the most widely recognised (and arguably insane, although in that nifty-creative Howard Hughes and Orson Welles way) Comic Book writer of all time, Alan Moore was born in Northampton, England, and got his start writing and drawing cartoon strips for music magazines such as The NME. He moved on to get regular work at Marvel UK, where he wrote the Captain Britain comic, and Two Thousand AD, where he wrote a series of acclaimed stories, including DR and Quinch and The Ballad of Halo Jones. This period included V for Vendetta, about an anarchist planning to take down a fascist UK Government, and Miracleman, a reinvention of a 1950s British superhero.
  • __NOEDITSECTION__ Image:Information-silk.png|Character Template rect 0 0 20 20 Staff Template desc none Alan Moore File:Alan Moore.jpg Gallery Real Name Alan Moore Employers [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[
  • Alan Moore is a comic book writer who authored a number of stories which appear in Classic Star Wars: Devilworlds including Blind Fury!, Rust Never Sleeps, Dark Lord's Conscience and Tilotny Throws a Shape. Along with Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns and Art Spiegelman's Maus, Moore's Watchmen (illustrated by Dave Gibbons) is credited as having brought an air of respectability to comics in the 1980s through its plot, which many considered mature and thoughtful, some critics heralding it the greatest comic book ever produced upon release.
  • Alan Moore is sent to the moon piloting an atomic powered space ship designed by Professor Manheim. This trip marks mankind's first foray into space travel. Amazed at the high rate of speed, Alan is surprised to come across another space ship. The craft sends a beam at Alan's ship, capturing in a "magnetic pull". Once aboard the other craft, Moore is addressed by the Martian space pirate Jana. Jana flees the Mars-Venus Patrol. The pirate has made captives of Professor Fenrir and the professor's daughter, Desua. Jana's craft has run out of fuel, and he intends to use Alan's ship to refuel the atomic engines. Alan resists, but is overcome by superior numbers.
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Creations
  • Watchmen, V for Vendetta, Lost Girls, From Hell
Row 4 info
  • John Bulthuis
Nombrereal
  • Alan Moore
Personaje
  • Él mismo
Row 1 info
  • Alan Moore
Row 4 title
  • Created by
Row 2 info
  • Weird Tales of the Future #1
Aparicion
  • JABF17
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  • Real Name
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  • First Appearance
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  • Key
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  • Original Publisher
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Box Title
  • Alan Moore
Nombre
  • Alan Moore
Picture
  • AlanMoore.jpg
Claim to Fame
  • Comic book writer
Appearance
  • "Husbands and Knives"
Other
  • *Watchmen *V for Vendetta *The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen *Batman: The Killing Joke
Name
Text
  • The Star Wars EU/ Watchmen Connection
Caption
  • Mr. Moore
First
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Birthdate
  • 1953-11-18
Comic
MonthOfBirth
  • November
Links
  • * http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Moore * http://www.comicon.com/moore/moore.htm
YearOfBirth
  • 1953
Nacimiento
  • 18
Data
  • Genre
  • Occupation
  • Born
  • Pen Name
Titles
  • Writer
CityOfBirth
  • Northampton
SW
  • *Dark Lord's Conscience *Blind Fury! *Rust Never Sleeps *The Pandora Effect *Tilotny Throws a Shape
dbkwik:liberapedia/property/wikiPageUsesTemplate
DayOfBirth
  • 18
Employers
  • 2000
Character
Imagen
  • Alan Moore1.png
Occupation
  • Comic book writer
  • writer
url
  • vault/books/news20090309.html
Gender
  • Male
  • male
RealName
  • Alan Moore
CountryOfBirth
  • England
  • U.K.
Birthname
  • Alan Moore
Pseudonyms
  • Curt Vile, Jill de Ray, Translucia Baboon
Birth
  • 1953-11-18
Nationality
  • English
Location
  • Northampton, England, UK
PersonalHistory
  • --05-12
campo
OfficialWebsite
  • * http://www.dodgemlogic.com/
Writer name
  • Alan Moore
Data4-c
  • 1953-11-18
Data2-c
  • Science fiction, fiction, non-fiction, superhero, horror
Data3-c
  • Curt Vile, Jill de Ray, Translucia Baboon, The Original Writer
Data1-c
  • Comics writer, novelist, short story writer, screenwriter, musician, cartoonist, magician
abstract
  • Originally a cartoonist, Moore decided he couldn't make a living in that fashion and began his career in writing. Working with Marvel comics, Moore wrote scripts for Marvel UK, continuing work on Captain Britain, and also work on 2000 AD. The most famous of his early works was the V for Vendetta series. He was hired in 1983 to write DC's Swamp Thing in which he introduced John Constantine who was later given his own series, Hellblazer. He also wrote his infamous story on the Joker called The Killing Joke. It was after this in 1986 that Moore started work on the Watchmen limited series with artist Dave Gibbons where he created an alternate reality in which costumed crime fighters actually exist, set in the uneasy period of the Cold War. This work, released as a graphic novel, later became Moore's most recognized work, and is also considered one of the greatest comic book series of all time. Moore, now one of the most widely known comic writers of the time, started his own brand called America's Best Comics as an imprinting of DC's WildStorm label, which contained one of his most popular works entitled League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.
  • Alan Moore is an acclaimed and award-winning British author, comic book writer, and magician who worships the ancient Roman snake god Glycon and who currently lives in Northampton, England. Among Moore's impressive list of works are From Hell, V for Vendetta, Watchmen, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Voice of the Fire, and Lost Girls. Moore is noted for both the quality of his writing and his complete and utter disdain for the commercialization of his works, particularly the adaptation of his writing into film. Moore has appeared in Something Positive twice, the first time when Davan is sending care packages to comic book writers [1] and later when Davan makes the mistake of admitting he loved the Watchmen film [2]. Davan loves Moore's work but is (rightly) scared shitless of the man.
  • __NOEDITSECTION__ Image:Information-silk.png|Character Template rect 0 0 20 20 Staff Template desc none Alan Moore File:Alan Moore.jpg Gallery Real Name Alan Moore Employers [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] Job Titles Writer Gender Date of Birth November 18, 1953 Place of Birth Northampton, England First publication Unknown
  • Alan Moore got his start writing some crap involving the Time Lords getting in a war in time that never went anywhere. He was also Andrew Cartmel's favorite writer. Cartmel tried to get him to write for Doctor Who, but Moore said that all the post-Hartnell Doctors were too pedophilic for his tastes. It's a fair assumption that he wasn't watching season 24 anyways, like most people in the world. Since his comics were just DWM backup strips, they didn't get into the reprints, graphic novels, or collections, so they're hard to find, unless you like torrents. But fortunately, all of the best ideas (including ideas from his completely unrelated comics like Halo Jones) were stolen by Larry Miles or Marc Platt for the novels, stolen by Marc Platt or Andrew Cartmel for the audios, or stolen by Andrew Cartmel or Steve Parkhouse for the comics, which of course means they've all been restolen by either RTD or Moffat for NuWho, so you've already seen them.
  • Alan Moore ist ein britischer Comic-Autor. Er schrieb folgende Doctor Who-Comicgeschichten: * Black Legacy * Business as Usual * Star Death * Black Sun Rising * 4-D War Berühmt wurde Alan Moore als Autor mit der Comic-Reihe Die Liga der außergewöhnlichen Gentlemen, in der er mehrfach Bezüge zum Doctor Who-Universum einbaute.
  • Probably the most widely recognised (and arguably insane, although in that nifty-creative Howard Hughes and Orson Welles way) Comic Book writer of all time, Alan Moore was born in Northampton, England, and got his start writing and drawing cartoon strips for music magazines such as The NME. He moved on to get regular work at Marvel UK, where he wrote the Captain Britain comic, and Two Thousand AD, where he wrote a series of acclaimed stories, including DR and Quinch and The Ballad of Halo Jones. This period included V for Vendetta, about an anarchist planning to take down a fascist UK Government, and Miracleman, a reinvention of a 1950s British superhero. Moore was then encouraged by DC Comics editor Len Wein to start work on Swamp Thing, Wein's classic horror comic. Originally about a scientist, Alec Holland, who had been transformed into a living plant monster after an explosion in his lab, Moore proposed a radical revision that revealed that Alec had in fact died in the explosion, and that the swamp creature had been created by plant elementals using Holland's memories as a basis for its character. Swamp Thing was not a man turned into a monster; he was never a man at all! Moore then took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, including an entire issue dedicated to psychic, psychedelic sex between Swampy and his human girlfriend, Abby. Moore also created the character of John Constantine for the comic. Along the way, he wrote a tiny handful of Superman stories which are now considered some of the very greatest ever written for the character (one was even adapted into an episode of Justice League Unlimited) and set the groundwork for a more extensive examination of Superman later in his career, through the pastiche character Supreme. Not to mention a tiny handful of Green Lantern stories that have become integral to its history ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize" and "Tygers"). Swamp Thing proved to be a massive success, and in the last years of Moore's run on the title, he was also handed another gaggle of existing characters to play with. DC had recently acquired the properties of Charlton Comics and Moore was asked to come up with a proposal for them. He came back with a dark tale that drew heavily on the mid-80s Cold War angst, in which the Charlton heroes discover that one of their number has been killed and that his death is connected to something that could lead to nuclear armageddon. DC was impressed by the pitch but was worried that Moore's pitch would render a number of the characters unusable by the end of the story. Instead, they advised him to create an entirely new series, and so Watchmen was born. Mature beyond anything that mainstream comics had published up to that point and with a level of complexity that rivaled the most highbrow books of the time (and continues to rival the best that many writers can come up with), Watchmen proved to be a massive sensation, and with Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns, effectively launched the Dark Age of comics. (Moore's Batman one-shot The Killing Joke in 1988 was another big success in this regard -- its approach to the Joker became the Trope Namer for Multiple Choice Past.) It also contributed heavily to the growing realisation in the mainstream media that comics are an art form, along with other comics such as Art Spiegelman's Maus and Gilbert and Jamie Hernandez's Love and Rockets. Ironically, the popularity of Watchmen was the first nail in Moore's relationship with DC; the contract that he and artist David Gibbons had signed promised them that full rights to the comic would be returned to them if the book fell out of print for more than two years. At this point in time, paperback collections of comic books were virtually unheard of and the idea that Watchmen would remain in print that long was absurd. However, the book's popularity kept it in print from 1987 through to the present day, and neither Moore nor Gibbons ever received the rights. Moore's relationship with Marvel Comics was also strained, and for similar reasons. After Watchmen, Moore moved into independent comics, writing Brought To Light, a history of the CIA; Lost Girls, a piece of highbrow erotica; and A Small Killing, the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy. In the mid-90s, he also began doing more work-for-hire writing for companies such as Wildstorm Comics and Image Comics. Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included Promethea, a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); Top Ten, a pastiche of Police Procedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and Tom Strong, a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the best-known ABC comic, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, is a Victorian-era set superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of Dracula, reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (King Solomons Mines), Captain Nemo (20,000 Leagues Under the Sea), Hawley Griffin (The Invisible Man) and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde (duh). However, Wildstorm was bought out by DC Comics and Moore subsequently parted from America's Best Comics. As of 2008, the only title he plans to write with any regularity is The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, which after The Black Dossier, will be published through Top Shelf Productions. He is also currently working on his second prose novel, tentatively titled Jerusalem. Apparently, his amazing talent comes from Satan. Not by selling his soul for it, mind you, but because he used to beat Satan up for his lunch money until the Devil bribed Moore with genius to leave him alone. Additionally, Death is afraid of him. He is known, with a particularly vivid description of From Hell, to have driven Neil "Scary Trousers" Gaiman to leave a restaurant to go outside and get some fresh air so he wouldn't vomit. Twice. Gaiman also wrote this short comic about him, which pretty much sums up how many people view him. Did we mention he's also polyamorous, vegetarian, anarchist and an accomplished chaos mage? Sometimes goes by the name of Translucia Baboon to warn us all about ducks. Is the quintessential modern Mad Artist. * Appeal to Audacity: Whether done deliberate by Moore is open to debate, this is one of the cornerstones of his works by his fans. * Makes Just as Much Sense in Context: Vary from work to work but more than one fan can describe him like this. * Magic, especially as a supernatural expression of information * Anarchy as a positive force. He's actually quite proud of the Guy Fawkes mask becoming a symbol. * Wordplay (and imageplay) * Synchronicity * Making heavy use of the Match Cut technique to present a united narrative. * The effect of the presence of superheroes or the supernatural on "real world" culture and society. This involves averting Reed Richards Is Useless and Cut Lex Luthor a Check. * Reinvention of existing characters * Mixing fiction and historical fact * Drugs are great! His works often feature characters using hallucinogens to positive effect, such as Ozymandias in Watchmen and the cop in V for Vendetta. Also, when Miracleman changes the world, he legalises all drugs. * Lots of sex. Lost Girls and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Black Dossier stand out. * He also has a thing for Rape as Drama. However, it is almost always done tactfully. But some scenes in his current Neonomicon project take explicit rape to Nausea Fuel lengths. * Darker and Edgier: Along with Miller's The Dark Knight Returns, Moore's earlier works have been credited with leading the trend. Note that his works, while often dark, are almost always idealistic, and his later works were often lighter (while always retaining an edge). * Surreal Horror: Several of his lates works contain heavy dosis of this. * Deconstruction, especially in the form of Deconstruction Crossover. Actually, Moore probably codified the latter trope with his graphic novel series The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. * Reconstruction, especially considering how some of his more famous deconstructive works ushered in the Dark Age. His works such as 1963, his runs on Supreme and Youngblood as well as Tom Strong are clear examples. * Experimentation with form: symmetrical and chiastic story structures (e.g. the pirate comics in Watchmen), playing with the chronological order of events (the fourth chapter of Watchmen, which jumps back and forth between the past, present, and future), as well as layouts enabling dialogue to be read in different orders (e.g. the Mobius strip segment in Promethea). * Disinterest in movie adaptations of his work and Hollywood in general. * However, he did like the JLU adaptation of his Superman story "For the Man Who Has Everything". This was possibly because they weren't his characters, and the producers bothered to ask him first. Notably, his name actually appears in the credits for the episode. * He's also stated explicitly that he does not think as poorly of them as he is generally reputed to. Generally, his opinion is more along the lines that his works are made specifically to be comic books, and will not hold up in transition. * Freemasonry, often with ominous, but not supernatural, undertones. * And, of course, Doing It for the Art. He never does it for anything else. * Black Comedy and Kafka Komedy: A lot of his work from his early days at Two Thousand AD is overflowing with this (especially DR & Quinch and his collection of Tharg's Future Shocks). These themes remain in his later works, but they are not nearly as prevalent as they are in some of his oldest stories. * Humans Are Flawed / Crapsack World: Every major character in his stories will always be guaranteed to have some kind of obvious flaw or otherwise unlikable trait, a variant of Humans Are Bastards and Humans Are Morons perhaps being the two most common (but certainly not the only ones), while the city/world/universe his stories take place in are very grim and despairing places; no one ever really has much hope for anything in Moore's stories, let alone hope for their own personal ambitions or goals in the story (even if the story concludes with a genuinely happy ending). * Along with this, Black and Grey Morality is pretty much a given. * Idiosyncratic Episode Naming: Chapter titles in his individual works occasionally follow a common theme. For example, V for Vendetta and words that begin with the letter V, Watchmen and its Literary Allusion Titles, DR & Quinch and titling each separate story "DR & Quinch _______" and so forth.. * Alternate Company Equivalent and Expy characters abound in many of his works. * Miracleman (AKA Marvelman; 1982-1984) * V for Vendetta (1982-1988) * DR and Quinch (1983-1985) * The Ballad of Halo Jones (1984-1986) * Swamp Thing (1984-1987) * For the Man Who Has Everything (1985) * Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? (1986) * Watchmen (1986-1987) * The Killing Joke (1988) * From Hell (1991-1996) * Lost Girls (1991-2006) * Nineteen Sixty Three (1993) * Voice of the Fire (novel; 1996) * Youngblood Judgment Day (1997) * Supreme (1997-1998) * Top Ten and various spin offs (1999-2001) * Tom Strong (1999-2006) * Promethea (1999-2005) * The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (1999-present)
  • Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953) is an English writer known for work in comics, including the acclaimed comic book series Watchmen, V for Vendetta, From Hell and Batman: The Killing Joke. He voiced himself in "Husbands and Knives".
  • Alan Moore is sent to the moon piloting an atomic powered space ship designed by Professor Manheim. This trip marks mankind's first foray into space travel. Amazed at the high rate of speed, Alan is surprised to come across another space ship. The craft sends a beam at Alan's ship, capturing in a "magnetic pull". Once aboard the other craft, Moore is addressed by the Martian space pirate Jana. Jana flees the Mars-Venus Patrol. The pirate has made captives of Professor Fenrir and the professor's daughter, Desua. Jana's craft has run out of fuel, and he intends to use Alan's ship to refuel the atomic engines. Alan resists, but is overcome by superior numbers. Jana has Alan set adrift to die in space. Desua uses a magnetic beam light to beam capture Alan and bring him along behind Jana's vessel to the Moon. Landing on the moon, Alan sees that the space pirates, Professor Fenrir, and Desua are breathing the air. He removes his own helmet, which is nearly out of air, and takes the chance to see if the lunar air is breathable. He rushes the pirates, but is knocked out and taken by Jana before the High One, the ruler of the Moon Men. Jana says the group are invaders, but Professor Fenrir convinces the High One by showing the ruler Jana's true thoughts with a device called a thought stealer. The High One and his lunar men attack Jana's pirates, disarming them. The High One decrees Alan Moore and Jana will battle, a match Alan Moore wins easily with help from the Moon's lesser gravity. The pirates are taken prisoner. Alan Moore returns to Earth and the waiting Professor Manheim in Jana's vessel. He takes Desua and Fenrir with him to show them Earth, promising to return them to their own planet afterward. Professor Manheim is surprised at Alan's new craft. Alan says it is good to breath Earth air again.
  • Alan Moore is a comic book writer who authored a number of stories which appear in Classic Star Wars: Devilworlds including Blind Fury!, Rust Never Sleeps, Dark Lord's Conscience and Tilotny Throws a Shape. Along with Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns and Art Spiegelman's Maus, Moore's Watchmen (illustrated by Dave Gibbons) is credited as having brought an air of respectability to comics in the 1980s through its plot, which many considered mature and thoughtful, some critics heralding it the greatest comic book ever produced upon release. He has written a number of other famous comics, including From Hell, V for Vendetta, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, and the one-shot Batman: The Killing Joke. Moore started out as a writer for British underground and alternative fanzines in the late 1970s before achieving success publishing comic strips in such comic book magazines as 2000 AD and Warrior. He was subsequently picked up by the American DC Comics, and as "the first comics writer living in Britain to do prominent work in America", he worked on big name characters such as Batman, writing Batman: The Killing Joke, and Superman with Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? In his work at DC he also markedly developed the character Swamp Thing, and penned original titles such as the highly revered Watchmen. During that decade, Moore had a tremendous effect on bringing about greater social respectability for the medium in the United States and United Kingdom. In the late 1980s and early 1990s he left the comic industry mainstream and went independent for a long while, working on experimental work such as the epic From Hell, the pornographic - or, as Moore says, "intelligently pornographic" - Lost Girls, and the prose novel Voice of the Fire. He subsequently made a return to the mainstream during the late 1990s, before developing America's Best Comics, an imprint through which he published other renowned works such as The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen and the occult-based Promethea. Moore is an occultist, ceremonial magician, and anarchist, and has featured such or similar themes in works including Promethea, From Hell, and V for Vendetta, as well as performing avant-garde spoken word occult "workings", some of which have been released on CD. His parents were also communists.
  • Alan Moore (Northampton, 18 de noviembre de 1953) es un guionista de historietas británico conocido por obras maestras del cómic. Llego a ser catalogado como el «Mejor Escritor de Historietas de la Historia».
  • Alan Oswald Moore (discovered 18 November 1953, somewhere in England by Fleetway Publishing) is one of the world's top ranking 13th level wizards. He has also been known to write comics while recovering from stints of summoning vast rampaging hordes of absinthe-driven lesbians to do his bidding, and sometimes his laundry. Few know he is actually based on the Golden Age hero Alane Moor.
  • In Greek religion and mythology, Alan Moore (/ˈælən mʊɹ/; Ancient Greek: Πάν) is the god of the suburban wilderness, guardians/watchmen, swamps, Hell, humanoid bats, masques, nature, and companion of lost girls. His name originates within the Marathi language, (from the word सूड व्ही, meaning "V for Vendetta.") He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat, in the same manner as a faun or satyr, and an enormous satyrian beard. With his homeland in rustic England, he is also recognized as the god of English countrysides, Scottish moors (hence his name), Kansas fields and lost girls. Moore is connected to fertility and the season of spring. The ancient Greeks also considered Alan Moore to be the god of criticism of interpretations of his own work. In Roman religion and myth, Moore's counterpart was Curt Vile, a nature god who was the father of Bona Dea, sometimes identified as Discordia; he was also closely associated with Lucifer, due to their similar relationships with Hell. In the 18th and 19th centuries, Moore became a significant figure in the Romantic movement of western Europe and also in the 20th-century Neopagan movement.
  • __NOEDITSECTION__ Image:Information-silk.png|Character Template rect 0 0 20 20 Staff Template desc none Alan Moore File:Moore.jpg Gallery Real Name Alan Moore Pseudonyms Curt Vile, Jill de Ray, Translucia Baboon Employers [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]], [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] , [[|]][[Category: Staff]] Gender Date of Birth November 18, 1953 Place of Birth Northampton, U.K. Creations Watchmen, V for Vendetta, Lost Girls, From Hell First publication Unknown
  • Alan Moore is a crazy man. An entertaining crazy man, that. He was once a great comic book writer, who wrote numerous comics. Several of his titles include Watchmen, V for Vendetta and has done work on Batman and Superman. He has a lot of concerns and views when it comes to his work.He doesn't like people making films based off his comics, and hates when other authors write for comics he made. He did the same exact thing with The League of Extraodinary Gentlemen. He claims he is an anarchist. He criticized liberals when Hollywood adapted V for Vendetta, claiming it was turned into liberal propaganda. However, he would later go on to support the Occupy Movement. He also believes in magic (Yes, that's right. Magic. As in the magic in Harry Potter.) He claims to worship a giant snake. How do we know for certain when he's truthfully describing his own beliefs and when he's writing entertaining fiction?
  • He was later regarded as one of the most acclaimed comic book writers of all time and profoundly influenced late 1980s Doctor Who era script editor Andrew Cartmel, who asked him to submit story ideas to him. Scenes from Moore's The Ballad of Halo Jones had an influence on the Doctor Who stories Paradise Towers, Dragonfire and The Greatest Show in the Galaxy as Cartmel had shown to script writers as an example of the style of story he wanted to, in part, emulate. His daughter, Leah Moore, has co-scripted The Whispering Gallery for IDW Publishing. Outside Doctor Who, Alan Moore is best recognised for his authorship of Watchmen, V for Vendetta, From Hell and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.
  • Alan Moore appeared in Coronation Street between July 1989 and February 1990 as Maurice Jones, the father of Steph Barnes and the builder of the non-terraced site of the street. He also appeared in The Wednesday Play, Nearest and Dearest Chessgame, Bulman, Robin of Sherwood and had a regular role in early 1970s drama Owen M.D..
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