PropertyValue
rdfs:label
  • Kansas City Shuffle
rdfs:comment
  • The Kansas City Shuffle is an old established name for a con game that depends on the mark believing that the conman is trying to con him, being right about it, but being wrong about how it's going to be done. Another way to say it is that it relies on the mark being "too smart for their own good."My name is Candle Jack, I don't write in black, it's part of my Kansas City ShuffleAll con-games rely on misdirection to some degree. In most, the conman wants the victim to believe that it's not a con at all. In a Kansas City Shuffle, the conman Examples of Kansas City Shuffle include:
owl:sameAs
dcterms:subject
dbkwik:all-the-tropes/property/wikiPageUsesTemplate
dbkwik:allthetropes/property/wikiPageUsesTemplate
abstract
  • The Kansas City Shuffle is an old established name for a con game that depends on the mark believing that the conman is trying to con him, being right about it, but being wrong about how it's going to be done. Another way to say it is that it relies on the mark being "too smart for their own good."My name is Candle Jack, I don't write in black, it's part of my Kansas City ShuffleAll con-games rely on misdirection to some degree. In most, the conman wants the victim to believe that it's not a con at all. In a Kansas City Shuffle, the conman 1. * Needs the victim to suspect that it's a con-game 2. * Needs the victim to think that they've figured out how to beat the con 1. * Needs the victim to be wrong about what the con is. All three elements must be present. If the victim doesn't suspect that they're being conned, it's not a Kansas City Shuffle. If the victim doesn't set themselves up for the real con by doing something to beat the con they think they've spotted, it's not a Kansas City Shuffle. If the victim is right about what the real con is, it's not a Kansas City Shuffle (or it is, but a failed one). Simply because a con is complicated, it's not necessarily a Kansas City Shuffle, and not all Kansas City Shuffles are complicated. They call my name, but with rope and a duffel sack, they're calling for trouble. See, you fear shadows but I'm too bright, I hit submit after you typeThe audience may or may not be in on the secret themselves. If they are then it can lead to a build up of Dramatic Irony but often the truth can be saved to The Reveal after the audience has been immersed in the intricacies of the apparent plot so that the shock to the character and the audience match.So one quickstep is all it takes to fall into a Kansas City ShuffleIt can overlap with, or be part of, a Batman Gambit, if the plotter relies on the pawn's predicted reaction to a piece of misinformation. If a beneficial outcome is assured regardless of whether or not the mark realizes he's being conned, it's probably also a Xanatos Gambit. The Trope Namer is the song "The Kansas City Shuffle" (see quote above) explained in detail in the movie Lucky Number Slevin. For those of you not from the US, Kansas City is actually in Missouri and is even the largest city in the state. There is a Kansas City, Kansas (it's right across the river), but it's much smaller and usually not what people are talking about when they mention a Kansas City. It throws off many Americans, too, especially those who write off the Midwest as Flyover Country. This is actually a near-perfect physical metaphor, as "when they look on one side of the river, you're on the other". May be employed by means of a Revealing Coverup. Compare Infraction Distraction, where a similar ploy is used with offenses. Compare Two Rights Make a Wrong and Massive Multiplayer Scam. Feed the Mole may be a tactic done as part of this strategy. May involve Reverse Psychology. Highly impractical against marks who are Too Dumb to Fool. Examples of Kansas City Shuffle include: