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  • Le Morte d'Arthur
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  • Le Morte d'Arthur is a book by Sir Thomas Malory.
  • Le Morte d'Arthur is the thirteenth and final episode in the first series of Merlin, which was first broadcast on the 13th of December, 2008. It marked the final appearance of Nimueh, concluding the arc that had passed through the series. The title was taken from that of Le Morte D'arthur, a fifteenth century compilation of Arthurian tales, written by Thomas Malory.
  • There is some original material in Le Morte d'Arthur but Malory's main intention was to gather together in one volume an English language version of all of the pre-existing legends that had become associated with King Arthur. Early sections of the work are made up largely of material that first appeared in Latin in Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain, some of the tales had appeared in earlier English versions but most of the work is translated from French romances.
  • Le Morte d'Arthur (The Death of Arthur in English) was a piece of literature in the Arthurian traidition, written by Thomas Malory that compiled many of the existing French and English stories of King Arthur and his Knights. One book of the work focuses on the search of the Holy Grail by Sir Galahad and other knights. Written in the mid fifteenth century, it was partially based on the older French work The Quest of the Holy Grail.
  • Sir Thomas Malory (c. 1405--1471; his name is also spelt Mallory and a handful of other variants) was an English writer whose version of the King Arthur mythos, Le Morte d'Arthur, is often treated as the definitive version. This is partially due to the fact that the book was one of the first to be printed in Britain (by William Caxton in 1485, 14 years after Malory's death), and subsequently reached a high circulation. Oddly enough, in popular scholarly opinion Malory was himself an evil knight, who wrote the tale during his various stints in prison for robbery, murder, and rape.
  • Le Morte d'Arthur, Le Morte Darthur or as the spelling of the first edition was from 1485, a spelling also called in later (scientific) publications was applied, is a series of stories around King Arthur, compiled and written by Sir Thomas Malory. The title is old-French and means the death of Arthur. The definite article le (instead of la) is according to Stephen h. a. Shepherd a mistake by Malory. The Winchester-Edition consists of the listed eight parts and describes successively T.H. White in his famous also makes The Once and Future King series of books using Malory's sources and work.
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  • Le Morte d'Arthur
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  • 2008-12-13
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abstract
  • Sir Thomas Malory (c. 1405--1471; his name is also spelt Mallory and a handful of other variants) was an English writer whose version of the King Arthur mythos, Le Morte d'Arthur, is often treated as the definitive version. This is partially due to the fact that the book was one of the first to be printed in Britain (by William Caxton in 1485, 14 years after Malory's death), and subsequently reached a high circulation. Le Morte d'Arthur means The Death of Arthur; it was originally only the title of the 8th and last "book" of Malory's narrative, which he named The Whole Book of King Arthur & of His Noble Knights of the Round Table. It was Caxton that changed the title to the one that was afterwards almost universally used, presumably because it was shorter. Oddly enough, in popular scholarly opinion Malory was himself an evil knight, who wrote the tale during his various stints in prison for robbery, murder, and rape. Malory also has a bit part in T. H. White's The Once and Future King, as the squire that King Arthur sent off to tell the story of the Round Table.
  • Le Morte d'Arthur is a book by Sir Thomas Malory.
  • Le Morte d'Arthur, Le Morte Darthur or as the spelling of the first edition was from 1485, a spelling also called in later (scientific) publications was applied, is a series of stories around King Arthur, compiled and written by Sir Thomas Malory. The title is old-French and means the death of Arthur. The definite article le (instead of la) is according to Stephen h. a. Shepherd a mistake by Malory. Malory, about whose life little is known with certainty, it would work partly have written during his imprisonment. He was convicted of various crimes several times.Malory based at scoring the stories on a single English and French sources known to him, to which he gave his own interpretation. He would have completed the work around 1470. A version, may not be the original manuscript, came into the hands of William Caxton, the first English printer, that work spent in 1485, when Malory probably already was dead. Caxton edited the work personally and did that on quite sloppy manner. He divided the text sometimes arbitrarily in 21 parts and made their own chapter format. The title of the work is taken from a note of Caxton at the end, where he writes: Thus endeth this noble and joyous book entitled Le Morte Darthur. The death of Arthur, where the title refers to, will not be, logically, discussed in the last section. Reprints of the work, always with small adjustments, were produced by among others Caxton's successor Wynkyn de Worde in 1498 and 1529, by William Copland in 1559, by Thomas East about 1585 and Stansby by Thomas in 1634. This last version was in the 19th century, when the story under the influence of the Romance came again in the spotlight, republished in 1816 and 1856. Then arose In 1934 for an interesting development: in the library of the Winchester College was by W.F. Oakshotte in a safe a manuscript dated could be detected around 1475. It turned out not to be but Malory's original manuscript older than and different from the version published by William Caxton. The manuscript consists of eight parts, and not from the Caxton devised by 21. Oakshotte was asked on the basis of this find to publish a new edition, but left that to the French/English literary expert Eugène Vinaver, a connoisseur in the field of French sources. A first edition of his hand appeared in 1947, a revised version came out in 1967. The Winchester-Edition consists of the listed eight parts and describes successively 1. * Arthurs birth and rise 2. * the fight against the Romans 3. * the story of Lancelot: "The Noble Tale of Sir Launcelot Du Lac" 4. * the story of Sir Gareth (brother of Gawain) 5. * Tristan and Isolde 6. * the quest for the Holy Grail: "The Noble Tale of the Sangreal" 7. * The Knight of the Cart, about the affair between Lancelot and Guinevere 8. * Arthur's death and the end of the Knights of the round table The English poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson wrote in the 19th century a series of poems based on Malory's work under the title Idylls of the King. T.H. White in his famous also makes The Once and Future King series of books using Malory's sources and work.
  • Le Morte d'Arthur (The Death of Arthur in English) was a piece of literature in the Arthurian traidition, written by Thomas Malory that compiled many of the existing French and English stories of King Arthur and his Knights. One book of the work focuses on the search of the Holy Grail by Sir Galahad and other knights. Written in the mid fifteenth century, it was partially based on the older French work The Quest of the Holy Grail. It was a work with which Grail scholar Henry Walton Jones, Sr. was familiar. In 1945, Jones quoted a description of a spear from the work to Brendan O'Neal, connecting it to the Spear of Longinus: "With that, the knights heard the chamber door open, and there they saw angels' and two bore candles of wax, and the third a towel, and the fourth a spear which bled marvelously....and the two set the candles upon the table, and the third the towel upon the vessel, and the fourth the Holy Spear even upright upon the vessel."
  • Le Morte d'Arthur is the thirteenth and final episode in the first series of Merlin, which was first broadcast on the 13th of December, 2008. It marked the final appearance of Nimueh, concluding the arc that had passed through the series. The title was taken from that of Le Morte D'arthur, a fifteenth century compilation of Arthurian tales, written by Thomas Malory.
  • There is some original material in Le Morte d'Arthur but Malory's main intention was to gather together in one volume an English language version of all of the pre-existing legends that had become associated with King Arthur. Early sections of the work are made up largely of material that first appeared in Latin in Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain, some of the tales had appeared in earlier English versions but most of the work is translated from French romances.
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