PropertyValue
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rdfs:label
  • The Bells of Notre Dame
  • The Bells of Notre Dame
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  • The Bells of Notre Dame (Las campanas de Notre Dame en Latinoamérica y El Son de Notre Dame en España)Es una canción de apertura y cierre de la película de 1996, The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • "The Bells of Notre Dame" is the opening song from the 1996 Disney film, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, composed by Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz. It is sung at the beginning of the film by the clown-like gypsy, Clopin. It is a grand, atmospheric way to open one of Disney's darker and more dramatic animated films.
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Albums
Lyrics by
Length
  • 384.0
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dbkwik:disney/property/wikiPageUsesTemplate
dbkwik:es.disney/property/wikiPageUsesTemplate
Singer
  • Archdeacon
  • Chorus
  • Claude Frollo
  • Clopin
Name
  • The Bells of Notre Dame
Films
  • The Hunchback of Notre Dame
Composer
Followed By
abstract
  • The Bells of Notre Dame (Las campanas de Notre Dame en Latinoamérica y El Son de Notre Dame en España)Es una canción de apertura y cierre de la película de 1996, The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • "The Bells of Notre Dame" is the opening song from the 1996 Disney film, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, composed by Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz. It is sung at the beginning of the film by the clown-like gypsy, Clopin. The song details about Quasimodo's origin and is the film's opening credits. During the song, Clopin tells young children about the mysterious bell-ringer of Notre Dame. He then talks about a story that goes back twenty years where a group of gypsies attempted to ferry their way into Paris, but a trap had been laid and most of them are captured and taken to the Palace of Justice by Judge Claude Frollo and several soldiers to be executed. When Quasimodo's mother amongst gypsies is seen carrying a bundle, a guard attempts to confiscate it, prompting her to flee. Frollo pursues her on his horse, believing her to have stolen goods, in a brutal chase that comes to a head on the steps of Notre Dame Cathedral. Here, he takes the bundle out of her arm but, in doing so, strikes a blow to her head with his boot, causing her to fall down onto the stone steps, breaking her neck and killing her. He then learns that the bundle is actually a deformed baby. He sees a well and attempts to drown him, as he believes it's a demon from Hell, but is stopped by the Archdeacon, who tells him that he has killed an innocent woman and that, if he wishes for the survival of his immortal soul, he must spare the child and raise as his own. He reluctantly does so and raises the baby in the bell tower of Notre Dame and gives him a cruel name, Quasimodo, which, according to Clopin, means "half-formed". It is quickly learned that Quasimodo is the mysterious bell-ringer. It is a grand, atmospheric way to open one of Disney's darker and more dramatic animated films.
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