PropertyValue
rdf:type
rdfs:label
  • Battle of Gettysburg
rdfs:comment
  • When the news of the US defeat in the 1st Battle of the North Pacific was broken to the general public, along with German advances in Russia and North Africa, news caster Lowell Thomas reminded his listeners that the upcoming Fourth of July would be the most anxious in the nation's history since 1863, when the armies of the North and South had just clashed at Gettysburg.
  • The battle of Gettsyburg(July 1-3,1863) was a battle that turn the war in favor of the Union. Before Gettsyburg, the Army of the Potomac had lost many battles to the Army of Northern Virgninia commanded by Robert E Lee. Gettsyburg took three days. At the end of the three days about 46,000 men will be killed,wounded or missing.
  • The Battle of Gettysburg was a battle during the American Civil War that took place near the town of Gettysburg. In 2156, Jonathan Archer compared the remnants of his dinner at the Lotus Blossom to the Battle of Gettysburg. (ENT novel: Beneath the Raptor's Wing)
  • The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1, 1863 -- July 3, 1863), fought outside Gettysburg, Penn., was the bloodiest battle of the American Civil War. The three-day battle was exceptionally bitter and costly to both sides, like my fight with my girlfriend Brooke last week. Robert E. Lee could accept his losses and retreat from the field of battle, but Brooke and I had something special.
  • The Battle of Gettysburg (local Image:Speakerlink.svg/ˈɡɛtɨsbɜrɡ/, with an /s/ sound), was fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. It was the battle with the largest number of casualties in the American Civil War and is often described as the war's turning point. Union Maj. Gen. George Gordon Meade's Army of the Potomac defeated attacks by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, ending Lee's invasion of the North.
  • The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1 – July 3, 1863), fought in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, as part of the Gettysburg Campaign, was the bloodiest battle of the American Civil War and is frequently cited as the war's turning point. Union Major General George G. Meade's Army of the Potomac decisively defeated attacks by Confederate General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, ending Lee's second and final invasion of the North.
  • The Battle of Gettysburg (, with an sound) was fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania between Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War. The battle involved the largest number of casualties of the entire war and is often described as the war's turning point. Union Maj. Gen. George Gordon Meade's Army of the Potomac defeated attacks by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, ending Lee's invasion of the North.
owl:sameAs
Strength
  • 1
  • 71699
  • 93921
  • Such beauty, and yet such anger
dcterms:subject
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Partof
  • the American Civil War
  • the American Civil War,
Revision
  • 1003782
Date
  • 1863-07-03
  • 2006-08-17
  • --07-01
Commander
Align
  • right
Caption
  • 259200.0
  • The Battle of Gettysburg, by Thure de Thulstrup
Width
  • 35.0
colour scheme
  • background:#cccccc
Description
  • 4.0
Casualties
  • 23055
  • 23231
  • My heart, my car
  • Nothing. Is that fair?!
Result
  • Union victory
  • Total heartbreak, Brooke victory.
Image
Campaign
  • The March away from Brooke
combatant
  • 15
  • Me
  • United States
  • CSA (Confederacy)
  • Brooke
ID
  • 1938-07-04
no-location-property
  • yes
Video
Place
Source
  • Bruce Catton, Glory Road
Conflict
  • Battle of Gettysburg
  • The War of Brooke's Aggression
battle name
  • Battle of Gettysburg
Quote
  • [The Army of the Potomac] had won a victory. It might be less of a victory than Mr. Lincoln had hoped for, but it was nevertheless a victory—and, because of that, it was no longer possible for the Confederacy to win the war. The North might still lose it, to be sure, if the soldiers or the people should lose heart, but outright defeat was no longer in the cards.
abstract
  • The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1 – July 3, 1863), fought in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, as part of the Gettysburg Campaign, was the bloodiest battle of the American Civil War and is frequently cited as the war's turning point. Union Major General George G. Meade's Army of the Potomac decisively defeated attacks by Confederate General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, ending Lee's second and final invasion of the North. Following his brilliant success at Chancellorsville in May 1863, Lee led his army through the Shenandoah Valley for his second invasion of the North, hoping to reach as far as Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, or even Philadelphia, and to influence the Northern politicians to give up their prosecution of the war. Prodded by President Abraham Lincoln, Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker moved his army in pursuit, but was relieved almost on the eve of battle and replaced by Meade. The two armies began to collide at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, as Lee urgently concentrated his forces there. Low ridges to the northwest of town were defended initially by a Union cavalry division, which was soon reinforced with two corps of Union infantry. However, two large Confederate corps assaulted them from the northwest and north, collapsing the hastily developed Union lines, sending the defenders retreating through the streets of town to the hills just to the south. On the second day of battle, most of both armies had assembled. The Union line was laid out resembling a fishhook. Lee launched a heavy assault on the Union left flank and fierce fighting raged at Little Round Top, the Wheatfield, Devil's Den, and the Peach Orchard. On the Union right, demonstrations escalated into full-scale assaults on Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill. Across the battlefield, despite significant losses, the Union defenders held their lines. On the third day of battle, July 3, fighting resumed on Culp's Hill and cavalry battles raged to the east and south, but the main event was a dramatic infantry assault by 12,500 Confederates against the center of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge. Pickett's Charge was repulsed by Union rifle and artillery fire at great losses to the Confederate army. Lee led his army on a torturous retreat back to Virginia. Over 51,000 Americans were casualties in the three-day battle, men commemorated by President Lincoln that November in his historic Gettysburg Address.
  • When the news of the US defeat in the 1st Battle of the North Pacific was broken to the general public, along with German advances in Russia and North Africa, news caster Lowell Thomas reminded his listeners that the upcoming Fourth of July would be the most anxious in the nation's history since 1863, when the armies of the North and South had just clashed at Gettysburg.
  • The Battle of Gettysburg (local Image:Speakerlink.svg/ˈɡɛtɨsbɜrɡ/, with an /s/ sound), was fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. It was the battle with the largest number of casualties in the American Civil War and is often described as the war's turning point. Union Maj. Gen. George Gordon Meade's Army of the Potomac defeated attacks by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, ending Lee's invasion of the North. After his success at Chancellorsville in Virginia in May 1863, Lee led his army through the Shenandoah Valley to begin his second invasion of the North—the Gettysburg Campaign. With his army in high spirits, Lee intended to shift the focus of the summer campaign from war-ravaged northern Virginia and hoped to influence Northern politicians to give up their prosecution of the war by penetrating as far as Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, or even Philadelphia. Prodded by President Abraham Lincoln, Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker moved his army in pursuit, but was relieved just three days before the battle and replaced by Meade. Elements of the two armies initially collided at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, as Lee urgently concentrated his forces there, his objective being to engage the Union army and destroy it. Low ridges to the northwest of town were defended initially by a Union cavalry division under Brig. Gen. John Buford, and soon reinforced with two corps of Union infantry. However, two large Confederate corps assaulted them from the northwest and north, collapsing the hastily developed Union lines, sending the defenders retreating through the streets of town to the hills just to the south. On the second day of battle, most of both armies had assembled. The Union line was laid out in a defensive formation resembling a fishhook. In the late afternoon of July 2, Lee launched a heavy assault on the Union left flank, and fierce fighting raged at Little Round Top, the Wheatfield, Devil's Den, and the Peach Orchard. On the Union right, demonstrations escalated into full-scale assaults on Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill. All across the battlefield, despite significant losses, the Union defenders held their lines. On the third day of battle, July 3, fighting resumed on Culp's Hill, and cavalry battles raged to the east and south, but the main event was a dramatic infantry assault by 12,500 Confederates against the center of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge, known as Pickett's Charge. The charge was repulsed by Union rifle and artillery fire, at great losses to the Confederate army. Lee led his army on a torturous retreat back to Virginia. Between 46,000 and 51,000 soldiers from both armies were casualties in the three-day battle. That November, President Lincoln used the dedication ceremony for the Gettysburg National Cemetery to honor the fallen Union soldiers and redefine the purpose of the war in his historic Gettysburg Address.
  • The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1, 1863 -- July 3, 1863), fought outside Gettysburg, Penn., was the bloodiest battle of the American Civil War. The three-day battle was exceptionally bitter and costly to both sides, like my fight with my girlfriend Brooke last week. Robert E. Lee could accept his losses and retreat from the field of battle, but Brooke and I had something special. Despite several brutal attacks, Union forces maintained their hold on the terrain, just like Brooke keeps her grip on my heart. Honestly, baby, I'm sorry. Daniel Sickles didn't mean to expose the Army of the Potomac's flank and I didn't mean to share your secrets with my friends. Please, I just want to re-establish what we had. Let me be your Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. Nearly 50,000 Americans were casualties in the battle, considered by most to be the war's turning point. Two years of sharp and bloody fighting lay ahead, but from then on the Confederacy would be placed on the defensive (like me), and lack the resources to recapture its former glory (like me).
  • The battle of Gettsyburg(July 1-3,1863) was a battle that turn the war in favor of the Union. Before Gettsyburg, the Army of the Potomac had lost many battles to the Army of Northern Virgninia commanded by Robert E Lee. Gettsyburg took three days. At the end of the three days about 46,000 men will be killed,wounded or missing.
  • The Battle of Gettysburg was a battle during the American Civil War that took place near the town of Gettysburg. In 2156, Jonathan Archer compared the remnants of his dinner at the Lotus Blossom to the Battle of Gettysburg. (ENT novel: Beneath the Raptor's Wing)
  • The Battle of Gettysburg (, with an sound) was fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania between Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War. The battle involved the largest number of casualties of the entire war and is often described as the war's turning point. Union Maj. Gen. George Gordon Meade's Army of the Potomac defeated attacks by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, ending Lee's invasion of the North. After his success at Chancellorsville in Virginia in May 1863, Lee led his army through the Shenandoah Valley to begin his second invasion of the North—the Gettysburg Campaign. With his army in high spirits, Lee intended to shift the focus of the summer campaign from war-ravaged northern Virginia and hoped to influence Northern politicians to give up their prosecution of the war by penetrating as far as Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, or even Philadelphia. Prodded by President Abraham Lincoln, Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker moved his army in pursuit, but was relieved just three days before the battle and replaced by Meade. Elements of the two armies initially collided at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, as Lee urgently concentrated his forces there, his objective being to engage the Union army and destroy it. Low ridges to the northwest of town were defended initially by a Union cavalry division under Brig. Gen. John Buford, and soon reinforced with two corps of Union infantry. However, two large Confederate corps assaulted them from the northwest and north, collapsing the hastily developed Union lines, sending the defenders retreating through the streets of town to the hills just to the south. On the second day of battle, most of both armies had assembled. The Union line was laid out in a defensive formation resembling a fishhook. In the late afternoon of July 2, Lee launched a heavy assault on the Union left flank, and fierce fighting raged at Little Round Top, the Wheatfield, Devil's Den, and the Peach Orchard. On the Union right, Confederate demonstrations escalated into full-scale assaults on Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill. All across the battlefield, despite significant losses, the Union defenders held their lines. On the third day of battle, July 3, fighting resumed on Culp's Hill, and cavalry battles raged to the east and south, but the main event was a dramatic infantry assault by 12,500 Confederates against the center of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge, known as Pickett's Charge. The charge was repulsed by Union rifle and artillery fire, at great losses to the Confederate army. Lee led his army on a torturous retreat back to Virginia. Between 46,000 and 51,000 soldiers from both armies were casualties in the three-day battle. On November 19, President Lincoln used the dedication ceremony for the Gettysburg National Cemetery to honor the fallen Union soldiers and redefine the purpose of the war in his historic Gettysburg Address.
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