PropertyValue
rdf:type
rdfs:label
  • Bedknobs and Broomsticks
  • Bedknobs and Broomsticks
rdfs:comment
  • Title and short intro here.
  • In the film, an apprentice witch, three children and a cynical conman (who had falsely claimed to be an expert in witchcraft) search for the missing component to a magic spell useful to the defense of Britain during World War II.
  • This 1971 Disney film, a take on a pair of novels by Mary Norton, is often regarded as a Spiritual Successor to Mary Poppins - a live action fantasy musical with a substantial segment incorporating animation, with the same director, same scriptwriters, same songwriters, etc.
  • To her distaste, however, she is assigned three young siblings from London to protect them from the Blitz bombings. The three, Charlie (Ian Weighill), Carrie (Cindy O'Callaghan) and Paul Rawlins (Roy Snart), discover that Miss Price is a witch when she recklessly takes off into the sky on her new broomstick after they try to escape back to London. The next morning at breakfast, Charlie tries to blackmail Miss Price by threatening to reveal her magic secrets. Miss Price demonstrates her powers by transforming Charlie into a white rabbit, who is subsequently chased about the cottage by Miss Price's black cat, Cosmic Creepers. Rather than be blackmailed Miss Price decides to win over their favor instead by giving the children one of her spells.
  • thumb|222px|Bedknobs and Broomsticks. Bedknobs and Broomsticks (La Bruja Novata en España y Travesuras de una bruja en Hispanoamérica) es una película que combina la animación con imagen real producida por Walt Disney Productions y estrenada en el año 1971. La película se basa en dos libros de Mary Norton, The Magic Bed-Knob (1943) y Bonfires and Broomsticks (1943), los cuales fueron más tarde publicados como un sólo libro bajo el título de Bed-Knob and Broomstick (1957). El estudio había comprado los derechos para producir una adaptación cinematográfica de la obra en el caso de que Mary Poppins (1964) fracasase. Sin embargo, la película de 1964 fue un gran éxito y aún así Bedknobs and Broomsticks fue llevada a cabo. Logró éxito por parte de la crítica si financialmente no alcanzó las espe
  • (The Disneycember logo is shown, before showing clips from Bedknobs and Broomsticks) Doug (vo): How do you top something as big as Mary Poppins? Well, getting almost the exact same group together helps. Yeah, the same director, the same song team, some of the same actors. Let’s work in a story that’s very similar. Maybe not a magic nanny, but a witch. And maybe not Julie Andrews, but Angela Lansbury. And maybe not Britain, but...yeah, okay, still Britain...but completely different kids. This resulted in Bedknobs and Broomsticks. What in many respects should’ve been just sort of a lame knockoff trying to recapture the Mary Poppins feeling actually does become its own unique thing. And it’s fun and imaginative and catchy and funny and has...Nazis in it. Yeah, we’ll get to that, but let’s sta
  • Bedknobs and Broomsticks is a 1971 musical film produced by Buena Vista Distribution and distributed by Walt Disney Pictures which combines live action and animation and was released in North America on December 19, 1971. It is based upon the books The Magic Bed Knob; or, How to Become a Witch in Ten Easy Lessons and Bonfires and Broomsticks by Mary Norton, and stars Angela Lansbury and David Tomlinson.
  • The film is frequently compared with Mary Poppins (1964), as it also combines live action and animation and is partly set in the streets of London. It shares several cast member from Mary Poppins, namely Tomlinson, supporting actor Reginald Owen (in his last film role) and Arthur Malet, a similar filmcrew, songwriters the Sherman Brothers, director Robert Stevenson, art director Peter Ellenshaw, and music director Irwin Kostal.
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dcterms:subject
Row 9 info
  • 24
Row 8 info
Row 4 info
  • Walt Disney
Row 7 title
  • Edition
Row 8 title
  • Publisher
Row 4 title
  • Theme
Row 9 title
  • Pages
Row 6 info
  • LGB Golden Press
Row 1 title
  • Author
Row 5 info
  • D93
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  • Illustrator
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  • Type
Row 5 title
  • Number
Row 3 info
  • 1971
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  • First year published
Row 7 info
  • 1.0
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Box Title
Starring
Editing
Runtime
  • 5760.0
  • 8340.0
  • 7140.0
Producer
Screenplay
Country
  • United States
Name
  • Bedknobs and Broomsticks
Caption
  • Theatrical poster
  • Bedknobs and Broomsticks movie poster
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Language
Cinematography
  • Frank V. Phillips
  • Frank Phillips
Title
  • Bedknobs and Broomsticks
Music
Image size
  • 200
Gross
  • 1.7871174E7
Studio
IMDB ID
  • 66817
Distributor
ID
  • 66817
Release
  • 1971-10-07
  • 1971-12-13
Released
  • 1971-10-07
  • 1971-12-13
Time
  • 8340.0
  • 7020.0
Image File
  • .jpg
Budget
  • 2.0E7
Writer
Director
abstract
  • Title and short intro here.
  • thumb|222px|Bedknobs and Broomsticks. Bedknobs and Broomsticks (La Bruja Novata en España y Travesuras de una bruja en Hispanoamérica) es una película que combina la animación con imagen real producida por Walt Disney Productions y estrenada en el año 1971. La película se basa en dos libros de Mary Norton, The Magic Bed-Knob (1943) y Bonfires and Broomsticks (1943), los cuales fueron más tarde publicados como un sólo libro bajo el título de Bed-Knob and Broomstick (1957). El estudio había comprado los derechos para producir una adaptación cinematográfica de la obra en el caso de que Mary Poppins (1964) fracasase. Sin embargo, la película de 1964 fue un gran éxito y aún así Bedknobs and Broomsticks fue llevada a cabo. Logró éxito por parte de la crítica si financialmente no alcanzó las esperanzas; también recibió un Óscar por "mejores efectos especiales" en 1972.
  • The film is frequently compared with Mary Poppins (1964), as it also combines live action and animation and is partly set in the streets of London. It shares several cast member from Mary Poppins, namely Tomlinson, supporting actor Reginald Owen (in his last film role) and Arthur Malet, a similar filmcrew, songwriters the Sherman Brothers, director Robert Stevenson, art director Peter Ellenshaw, and music director Irwin Kostal. The film received generally positive reviews from critics, scoring 66% on Rotten Tomatoes, and won the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects. This was the last film released prior to the death of Walt Disney's surviving brother, Roy O. Disney, who died one week later.
  • Bedknobs and Broomsticks is a 1971 musical film produced by Buena Vista Distribution and distributed by Walt Disney Pictures which combines live action and animation and was released in North America on December 19, 1971. It is based upon the books The Magic Bed Knob; or, How to Become a Witch in Ten Easy Lessons and Bonfires and Broomsticks by Mary Norton, and stars Angela Lansbury and David Tomlinson. The film has similarities to Mary Poppins (1964): combining live action and animation and partly set in London. It shares some of the cast, namely Tomlinson, supporting actor Reginald Owen, a similar film crew, songwriters the Sherman Brothers, director Robert Stevenson, art director Peter Ellenshaw, and music director Irwin Kostal. It is one of the final films to be produced before Roy O. Disney passed away.
  • This 1971 Disney film, a take on a pair of novels by Mary Norton, is often regarded as a Spiritual Successor to Mary Poppins - a live action fantasy musical with a substantial segment incorporating animation, with the same director, same scriptwriters, same songwriters, etc. It is 1940 in the British coastal village of Pepperinge Eye, and among the children evacuated here from the ongoing London Blitz are three orphaned siblings, Charlie, Carrie, and Paul. They are taken in by Miss Eglantine Price (Angela Lansbury), a spinster whom they discover is secretly taking mail-order witchcraft lessons in hopes of being able to aid the war effort with magic. But the school abruptly closes, leaving her without the all-important Substitutiary Locomotion spell she needs. She and the children travel to London via bed - in exchange for the children keeping her secret, she enchanted one of its bedknobs for them with a travelling spell - and discover the "professor", Emelius Browne, is a fraud who was just selling her the pages of an incomplete spellbook. So begins a greater journey, from the market at Portobello Road to the Isle of Naboombu (land of animated talking animals), in search of the spell. Once Miss Price learns it, she'll have to use its power to bring inanimate objects to life to save her hometown from none other than the Nazis.
  • To her distaste, however, she is assigned three young siblings from London to protect them from the Blitz bombings. The three, Charlie (Ian Weighill), Carrie (Cindy O'Callaghan) and Paul Rawlins (Roy Snart), discover that Miss Price is a witch when she recklessly takes off into the sky on her new broomstick after they try to escape back to London. The next morning at breakfast, Charlie tries to blackmail Miss Price by threatening to reveal her magic secrets. Miss Price demonstrates her powers by transforming Charlie into a white rabbit, who is subsequently chased about the cottage by Miss Price's black cat, Cosmic Creepers. Rather than be blackmailed Miss Price decides to win over their favor instead by giving the children one of her spells. Miss Price shows the children her secret room, where she demonstrates the famous travelling spell, via a bedknob which Paul pulled off Miss Price's late father's brass bed. The bed is now able to go anywhere that the spellcaster (Paul) wants. They are interrupted when Miss Price receives a letter from Professor Emilius Browne (David Tomlinson), the headmaster of the College of Witchcraft in London, which explains that the college has closed due to the war, leaving her without the final lesson: the spell for substitutionary locomotion - making inanimate objects move of their own accord. Miss Price and the children use the bed to fly to London, to find Mr. Browne and get the spell. They discover that Mr. Browne is only a conman and a common non-magical illusionist. Miss Price tells Mr. Browne her problems and he takes her and the children to "his" town house 8 Winchfield Rd, Lewisham...via the bed. The house is in fact in an abandoned part of bombed-out London. The area has been cleared out due to an undetonated German bomb. After the local residents cleared out, Mr. Browne moved in. The children explore the house and come across a nursery, in which Paul finds a children's picture book about the Lost Isle of Naboombu. He likes it so much that he takes it with him. In the library, Miss Price searches for the old book from which Mr. Browne got his spells, but when he distracts her with his plans to open up a magic show with her as his fabulous assistant, she changes him into a rabbit and makes him get the book for her, which is torn in half. They go to Portobello Road's marketplace, where Mr. Browne last saw the other half of the book. After the market closes, Miss Price and Mr. Browne meet a knife-wielding thug named Swinburne (Bruce Forsyth) and his boss, The Bookman, who has the other half of the book. Unfortunately, the spell is not in either of the parts: the paragraph, when completed, only tells the spell's legend, not the spell itself. The Bookman explains to Miss Price that the book once belonged to Astoroth, a legendary wizard who used his magic to make animals he had to emulate human-like qualities and behaviors. But they revolted, killed Astoroth, stole much of his magical spells & items, and escaped to the Isle of Naboombu. An island the Bookman says cannot be found on any map- that is until Paul shows him the children's book he kept from the nursery. The Bookman tries to grab Paul's book, but they escape on the bed, and to the mystical island. They crash land in the nearby lagoon and find an animated realm where fish can talk, and they can breathe under the water. Miss Price and Mr. Browne compete in an underwater dance contest, singing the film's most famous song "Bobbing Along On the Bottom of the Beautiful Briny Sea". They win first prize, but suddenly partying turns to peril when fish hooks come down and grab the bed, taking it and the children for a ride. Miss Price and Mr. Browne grab hold and follow after. On shore, a bear in a sailor suit is fishing and pulls the bed to shore. He is about to throw the humans back into the water, when Paul interrupts, showing him the book and demanding to see the king, as it's the law. The land is called the Island of Naboombu. The bear reluctantly takes them to meet the king's secretary, a Secretary Bird. The bird leads Mr. Browne into the king's tent after he reveals the king likes football, but lacks a referee. Mr. Browne emerges with the king, who turns out to be a lion. The group soon notice that the king is wearing a medallion: the Star of Astoroth, which has the words to the sought after spell engraved upon it. The king takes the group to the island's football stadium, where the humans sit in his private box with the secretary bird. The king makes Mr. Browne the referee, while he himself participates in the match, doffing his cloak to reveal a football kit. The Royal Cup match between the True Blues and the King's club called the Dirty Yellows then kicks off. After a lot of cartoon rough play, of which Mr. Browne is the biggest recipient, the game finally ends when a rhino accidentally bursts the ball with his horn and sends it spinning into the air. The king roars angrily, and sends all of the animals flying into the opposing team's goal. The ball floats down and the king blows it into the goal, winning the match. The humans steal the star medallion from the king, turning him into a rabbit. They read the magic words and wrap it up in a handkerchief. The group use the bed to return home, only to discover that the medallion has disappeared; items cannot be taken from one world to another. It turns out however the words had been in Paul's book (which somehow WAS able to travel between worlds - possibly because it was real and belonged in the real world to begin with, whereas the medallion was from the fantasy world) all along, allowing Miss Price to attempt the spell. She is unable to control it however; many objects inside her house come to life, including her nightgown (which Mr. Browne dances with), a pair of gloves (that punches him for dancing with the nightgown), and Charlie's Sunday trousers. Later that night, Miss Price laments her inability to control the spell and is finally cheered up when, while juggling apples, Mr. Browne drops one and splatters his face with gravy at the dinner table. After dinner, Mr. Browne is awkwardly confronted by the children as being their "Dad", whereupon he hurriedly leaves for the train station. During the night, the Germans launch a secret raid on England, taking over Miss Price's house and using it as their headquarters. Annoyed with her, they hold her captive in the village castle. At the train station, Browne sees two Germans cutting the phone lines and successfully wards them off. He then sneaks back to the house to find it overrun with Germans. Upon discovering that Miss Price and the children are no longer there, he is chased into Miss Price's workship by two Germans. Browne is able to turn himself into a rabbit just as they corner him and escapes. Presumably following Miss Price's scent trail, Mr. Browne finds her at the castle. He urges her to use the substitutionary locomotion spell to bring all the suits of armor and medieval weapons in the castle to life to attack the Germans. This time, Miss Price is able to control the spell and weapons from ancient Viking times to British imperial redcoats come to life, overpowering the guards outside the door, and marching in full force against the Germans. Miss Price leads the ensuing battle while riding a broom found in the castle. The Germans are dismayed to find that no matter how many bullets they fire, it has little effect on the magical army, only slowing them down long enough to empty out bullets from inside their armor. Eventually, the Germans flee in panic. The German colonel, who earlier had scoffed at Miss Price's magic, now tells his men to retreat, stopping only long enough to plant charges to blow up what they have to leave behind. The explosion destroys Miss Price's workshop causing her to immediately fall from the sky and the magical army of knights to fall where they stood. At this point, the Home Guard, hearing the gunfire, arrives at the beach to drive the Germans into the sea. Miss Price admits upon inspection of her ruined workshop that she believed she could never have really been a proper witch, declaring that if anyone felt the way she did about "poison dragon's liver" (one of her necessary magic ingredients), they had no business being a witch. A newspaper later reports the events of that day vaguely and unclear, speaking only of "mysterious happenings" that are largely ignored and anecdotal. Mr. Browne enlists to join the British Army, promising to return. As he departs down the road, Charlie complains that they won't have any more fun, to which Paul replies "we still have this, don't we?", pulling out the magical glittering bedknob.
  • In the film, an apprentice witch, three children and a cynical conman (who had falsely claimed to be an expert in witchcraft) search for the missing component to a magic spell useful to the defense of Britain during World War II.
  • (The Disneycember logo is shown, before showing clips from Bedknobs and Broomsticks) Doug (vo): How do you top something as big as Mary Poppins? Well, getting almost the exact same group together helps. Yeah, the same director, the same song team, some of the same actors. Let’s work in a story that’s very similar. Maybe not a magic nanny, but a witch. And maybe not Julie Andrews, but Angela Lansbury. And maybe not Britain, but...yeah, okay, still Britain...but completely different kids. This resulted in Bedknobs and Broomsticks. What in many respects should’ve been just sort of a lame knockoff trying to recapture the Mary Poppins feeling actually does become its own unique thing. And it’s fun and imaginative and catchy and funny and has...Nazis in it. Yeah, we’ll get to that, but let’s start from the beginning.
is Films of