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  • Gone With the Wind
  • Gone with the Wind
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  • Gone with the Wind is the third episode of Season 3 of the Oxongers.
  • Gone with the Wind is an American film, released in 1939. Based on the novel of the same name, it is a romance set in the South around the time of the Civil War. It was one of the most popular films of all time, and when adjusted for inflation, the highest ticket-selling movie of all time. In 1941, Indiana Jones hoped that the film that Musgrove and Nichols wanted to show him was not Gone with the Wind, since he had already seen it.
  • Gone with the Wind was a 20th century Human novel, which was adapted as a film in 1939. It is considered to be one of the best films ever made. In the year of its release, Benny Russell saw Gone With the Wind as part of a double bill with a Flash Gordon chapter. (DS9 novelization: Far Beyond the Stars) In 2264, Doctor Elizabeth Dehner compared Commander Melody Sawyer to Scarlett O'Hara, the strong-willed heroine of the book and film, crossed with John Wayne. (TOS novel: Strangers from the Sky)
  • For Brighty's Secret Game By Skye
  • "Gone with the Wind" is the first segment of the eleventh episode of the first season of The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh made by Walt Disney Television Animation. It originally aired on March 27, 1988.
  • After being buffeted by the wind, Piglet develops a fear of it. He even refuses to go outside. The friends must lift it, and get Piglet outside again.
  • Gone with the Wind is a 1939 American historical epic film adapted from Margaret Mitchell's Pulitzer-winning 1936 novel of the same name. It was produced by David O. Selznick and directed by Victor Fleming from a screenplay by Sidney Howard (all three of whom received Oscars for their work). Set in the 19th century American South, the film tells a story of the American Civil War and Reconstruction era from a Southern point of view.
  • Fred pays a visit to Ukulele Bottom to deliver Tom some upsetting news of Sally's death. Season: 1 Episode: 17 Total Episode Count: 17 Prod. no.: 1BQT18 Featuring: Tom, Shubie Also Appearing: Tyler, Vera, Taylor, Sandals, Abagail, Lenny, Mabel, Harold, Coach McFall, Dr. Fist, Angus, Gordy, Gus, Dennis, Medley Jones, Mr. Waterman, Carl, Len Stein, Mr. Flippers, Fred Rechid, Sally Smith, SpongeBob SquarePants, Sandy Cheeks, Pearl Krabs, Patrick Star, Squidward Tentacles, Plankton, John Fishly
  • Gone With the Wind, is a 1939 American film based on the 1916 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name by Margaret Mitchell. The novel is one of the most popular of all time, and the film adaptation became the highest-grossing film in the history of Hollywood and received a record-breaking number of Academy Awards. The title is taken from the first line of the third stanza of the poem Non sum qualis eram bonae sub regno Cynarae by Ernest Dowson: "I have forgot much, Cynara! gone with the wind."
  • One of the most successful films all time -- adjusted for inflation, its box office take is still two hundred million ahead of its closest rival, Star Wars -- Gone with the Wind is a romantic epic about an indomitable and ruthless Southern belle, stretching from just before The American Civil War through much of Reconstruction. Both the source novel and the studios of the Golden Age of Hollywood tended to romanticize the South, and so this is one of the most romantic films ever made, whether you want it to be or not.
  • In 1939, Gone with the Wind was adapted into film starring Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh, one of the most ambitious and most successful movies of the early 20th century. Among its many honors were ten Academy Awards, a record for most Oscars which held until Ben-Hur won eleven in 1959. It continues to be the highest-grossing domestic film in American history when adjusted for inflation. In 1998, the American Film Institute named Gone With the Wind the fourth-greatest film of the 20th century, following Citizen Kane, Casablanca, and The Godfather. Since then, the AFI routinely heaps comparable honors upon the film.
  • Rhett Butler and Scarlett O'Hara, the lead characters, embody that fire which is there dormant in us all, but we are unable to express it for want of the psychological infrastructure or because of the too great a value we attach to social values and personal compunctions. The hero and heroine were fully devoid of these outer restraints and inner inhibitions. When unimpeded by social inhibitions, human personality expands like the energy of these people and discards social values as they do. That is why these characters have captured the imagination of readers and live there so long with life.
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Season
  • 1
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Number
  • 11.0
Previous
  • "How Much is That Rabbit in the Window"
Featuring
Next Ep
  • Brotherly Love
Tagline
  • The most magnificent picture ever!
Music By
Starring
Cast
Series
Runtime
  • 14280.0
Producer
Screenplay
Release Date
  • 1939-12-15
Country
Wins
  • 8
Airdate
  • 1988-03-27
Caption
  • Cleveland at Loretta's funeral
Editing by
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dbkwik:gonewiththewind/property/wikiPageUsesTemplate
On DVD
  • Many Different Versions
Language
  • English
Episode Number
  • 17
Total
  • 17
Title
  • Gone With the Wind
  • Gone with the Wind
Awards
  • 12
Gross
  • 1.986E8
First Aired
  • 2010-04-11
Studio
Distributor
Nominations
  • 13
Plot
  • right|300px When Cleveland is diagnosed with high cholesterol, Donna puts him on a new high-fiber diet, which causes an intestinal backlash. When it begins to affect his work, he goes to see Dr. Fist who gives him a written note card explaining that he has a medical condition which he soon takes advantage of. Cleveland quickly realizes his gas might score him a few points in the Broken Stool’s karaoke contest. Donna is appalled that Cleveland should resort to such disgusting behavior but they are interrupted by a call that brings news of Loretta's death. Cleveland's old friend Quagmire from Quahog arrives with the body and explains that she was accidentally killed in one of Peter's stunts, of which Cleveland had survived numerous times. Worried for Cleveland Jr., they try to break the news gently and find he has already put his mother behind him. Still concerned for Jr., the family is shocked when it is Cleveland himself that falls to pieces at the funeral. Donna is puzzled and angry after everything Cleveland told her about Loretta that he could continue to have such feelings for her. At the Broken Stool, the guys try to cheer him up but it fails and to top it off, Donna decides to sing with Coach McFall. Cleveland heads to the cemetery where he ponders why he is so upset and has a flash of inspiration when he drops a cookie. He rushes back to the Stool where he lets Donna know he was suffering from survivor's guilt after having lasted through so many of Peter's stunts while Loretta is killed on the first try. Donna is skeptical at first but Cleveland wins her over and offers to sing their song in the karaoke contest. He tries to sing it without farting but the audience soon convinces him and Donna to cut loose and they win.
Based on
  • Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
NEXT
  • "Nothing But the Tooth"
Writers
assistant director
Budget
  • 3900000.0
Writer
Director
Year
  • 1939
wikipage disambiguates
musical numbers
Prod No
  • 1
in a sentence
  • Quagmire pays a visit to Stoolbend to deliver Cleveland some upsetting news of Loretta's death.
also appearing
abstract
  • Gone with the Wind is the third episode of Season 3 of the Oxongers.
  • Gone with the Wind is an American film, released in 1939. Based on the novel of the same name, it is a romance set in the South around the time of the Civil War. It was one of the most popular films of all time, and when adjusted for inflation, the highest ticket-selling movie of all time. In 1941, Indiana Jones hoped that the film that Musgrove and Nichols wanted to show him was not Gone with the Wind, since he had already seen it.
  • One of the most successful films all time -- adjusted for inflation, its box office take is still two hundred million ahead of its closest rival, Star Wars -- Gone with the Wind is a romantic epic about an indomitable and ruthless Southern belle, stretching from just before The American Civil War through much of Reconstruction. Both the source novel and the studios of the Golden Age of Hollywood tended to romanticize the South, and so this is one of the most romantic films ever made, whether you want it to be or not. Filmed in 1939 (having been in development since just after the book's publication in 1936) in glorious Technicolor. The original novel was written by Margaret Mitchell. It was followed by Scarlett, a sequel professional Fanfic, which was later adapted into a Miniseries. A prequel, Rhett Butler's People, has been published, telling the story from Rhett's perspective, and has a different ending than Scarlett. Another sequel by the name of Winds of Tara has been published. Bear in mind that this has another ending for those who are not happy with Scarlett. More recently, an alternate point-of-view parody has been written called The Wind Done Gone, which is the entire book written from the point of view of Scarlett's mulatto half-sister, whom she never notices in the original novel, and who Rhett himself takes as a lover. No explicit names are used, interestingly. In 2008, a musical production ran on the West End in London. It was savaged by the critics and closed early. As of May 2012, only five of the original cast members are still alive: Olivia de Havilland, Ann Rutherford, Mickey Kuhn, Alicia Rhett, and Mary Anderson.
  • In 1939, Gone with the Wind was adapted into film starring Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh, one of the most ambitious and most successful movies of the early 20th century. Among its many honors were ten Academy Awards, a record for most Oscars which held until Ben-Hur won eleven in 1959. It continues to be the highest-grossing domestic film in American history when adjusted for inflation. In 1998, the American Film Institute named Gone With the Wind the fourth-greatest film of the 20th century, following Citizen Kane, Casablanca, and The Godfather. Since then, the AFI routinely heaps comparable honors upon the film. A number of satires, spin-offs, and sequels to Gone with the Wind have been written, both authorized and otherwise. Harry Turtledove caricatured the image of dashing rogue Rhett Butler for his minor characters Thert the Butler in Marching Through Peachtree and Clark Butler in In at the Death. Inconsequential references to Butler and other characters from the novel/movie may be referenced in passing in other Turtledove works.
  • Gone with the Wind was a 20th century Human novel, which was adapted as a film in 1939. It is considered to be one of the best films ever made. In the year of its release, Benny Russell saw Gone With the Wind as part of a double bill with a Flash Gordon chapter. (DS9 novelization: Far Beyond the Stars) In 2264, Doctor Elizabeth Dehner compared Commander Melody Sawyer to Scarlett O'Hara, the strong-willed heroine of the book and film, crossed with John Wayne. (TOS novel: Strangers from the Sky)
  • Rhett Butler and Scarlett O'Hara, the lead characters, embody that fire which is there dormant in us all, but we are unable to express it for want of the psychological infrastructure or because of the too great a value we attach to social values and personal compunctions. The hero and heroine were fully devoid of these outer restraints and inner inhibitions. When unimpeded by social inhibitions, human personality expands like the energy of these people and discards social values as they do. That is why these characters have captured the imagination of readers and live there so long with life. Their pursuit of results is relentless. All who have achieved results pursue them in this relentless manner. In these people it looks brazen, shameless, wicked, and mercenary. Any one who has ever attained results attained them by refusing to taint it with social consciousness or psychological conscience. Not all people do what they do, but the essence is the same, only the expression differs. They defy those barriers but behave as if they cared for them. Results in any act are achieved only like this, especially immensely huge results. What succeeded for Scarlett was not her ideas, ambitions, or plans, but her nascent energy that was devoid of scruples. What worked for Rhett was not his masterful adjustments with the need of the hour or his money, but it was courage, energy, generosity and the dedicated pursuit of Scarlett whose energy he was attracted by. More so, her refusal of him was the greatest spur.
  • For Brighty's Secret Game By Skye
  • "Gone with the Wind" is the first segment of the eleventh episode of the first season of The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh made by Walt Disney Television Animation. It originally aired on March 27, 1988.
  • Fred pays a visit to Ukulele Bottom to deliver Tom some upsetting news of Sally's death. Season: 1 Episode: 17 Total Episode Count: 17 Prod. no.: 1BQT18 Featuring: Tom, Shubie Also Appearing: Tyler, Vera, Taylor, Sandals, Abagail, Lenny, Mabel, Harold, Coach McFall, Dr. Fist, Angus, Gordy, Gus, Dennis, Medley Jones, Mr. Waterman, Carl, Len Stein, Mr. Flippers, Fred Rechid, Sally Smith, SpongeBob SquarePants, Sandy Cheeks, Pearl Krabs, Patrick Star, Squidward Tentacles, Plankton, John Fishly Plot: When Tom is diagnosed with high cholesterol, Shubie puts him on a new high-fiber diet, which causes an intestinal backlash. When it begins to affect his work, he goes to see Dr. Fist who gives him a written note card explaining that he has medical condition which he soon takes advantage of. Tom quickly realizes his gas might score a few points in the Broken Stool's karaoke contest. Shubie is appalled that Tom should resort to such disgusting behavior but they are interrupted by a call that brings news of Sally's death. Tom's old friend Fred from Bikini Bottom arrives with the body and explains that she was accidentally killed in one of SpongeBob's stunts, of which Tom had survived numerous times. Worried for Tyler, they try to break the news gently and find he has already put his mother behind him. Still concerned for Tyler, the family is shocked when it is Tom himself that falls to pieces at the funeral. Shubie is puzzled and angry after everything Tom told her about Sally that he could continue to have such feelings for her. At the Broken Stool, the guys try to cheer him up but it fails and to top it off, Shubie decides to sing with Coach McFall. Tom heads to the cemetery where he ponders why he is so upset and has a flash of inspiration when he drops a cookie. He rushes back to the Stool where he lets Shubie know he was suffering from survivor's guilt after having lasted through so many of SpongeBob's stunts while Sally is killed on the first try. Shubie is first skeptical at first but Tom wins her over and offers to sing their song in the karaoke contest. He tries to sing it without farting but the audience soon convinces him and Shubie to cut loose and they win.
  • After being buffeted by the wind, Piglet develops a fear of it. He even refuses to go outside. The friends must lift it, and get Piglet outside again.
  • Gone With the Wind, is a 1939 American film based on the 1916 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name by Margaret Mitchell. The novel is one of the most popular of all time, and the film adaptation became the highest-grossing film in the history of Hollywood and received a record-breaking number of Academy Awards. Mitchell's work relates the story of a rebellious Georgia woman named Scarlett O'Hara and her travails with friends, family and lovers through the pre-war American South, the American Civil War, and the Reconstruction period. It also tells the story of the love that blossoms between Scarlett O'Hara and Rhett Butler. The title is taken from the first line of the third stanza of the poem Non sum qualis eram bonae sub regno Cynarae by Ernest Dowson: "I have forgot much, Cynara! gone with the wind."
  • Gone with the Wind is a 1939 American historical epic film adapted from Margaret Mitchell's Pulitzer-winning 1936 novel of the same name. It was produced by David O. Selznick and directed by Victor Fleming from a screenplay by Sidney Howard (all three of whom received Oscars for their work). Set in the 19th century American South, the film tells a story of the American Civil War and Reconstruction era from a Southern point of view. Hattie McDaniel, one of four performers in the film nominated for an Oscar, took home the Best Supporting Actress award, making her the first African-American to garner the honor. In addition to its eight competitive Oscar wins, Gone with the Wind also earned two honorary awards, bringing its total number of Oscars to 10, a record that would last for twenty years before being broken by Ben-Hur in 1960.
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